Compassion Strategies

These presentations focus on the ways in which health care professionals can help families deal with the physical, emotional and spiritual pain caused by the difficult situations they are dealing with.

Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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USA Cheryl Tatano Beck, DNSc, CNM, FAAN

Dr. Beck is a Distinguished Professor at the University of Connecticut, School of Nursing. Her Bachelor of Science degree in Nursing is from Western Connecticut State University. She received her Master’s degree in maternal-newborn nursing and became a certified nurse-midwife at Yale University. Her Doctor of Nursing Science degree is from Boston University. She is a fellow in the American Academy of Nursing. She has received numerous awards such as the Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric, and Neonatal Nursing’s Distinguished Professional Service Award and the Distinguished Alumna Award from Yale University. Over the past 30 years Cheryl has focused her research efforts on developing a research program on postpartum mood and anxiety disorders. She developed the Postpartum Depression Screening Scale (PDSS) which is published by Western Psychological Services. She is a prolific writer who has published over 140 journal articles. Cheryl’s textbook, Nursing Research: Generating and Assessing Evidence for Nursing Practice, received both the 2007 and the 2011 American Journal of Nursing Book of the Year Award. Her book entitled Postpartum Mood and Anxiety Disorders: A Clinician’s Guide received the 2006 American Journal of Nursing Book of the Year Award. She recently published another book, Traumatic Childbirth.

USA Cheryl Tatano Beck, DNSc, CNM, FAAN
Abstract:

This presentation brings visibility to the often invisible experience of traumatic childbirth and its ever widening ripple effect. Prevalence of birth trauma and its resulting PTSD are covered along with the essential components of a traumatic birth. Risk factors for mothers developing PTSD due to childbirth are identified. The following chronic effects of traumatic childbirth are described: its impact on breastfeeding, anniversary of the birth trauma, and subsequent childbirth. The impact of traumatic childbirth extends beyond the mother herself to her infant, partner, and clinicians who were present during the birth trauma. Also addressed in this presentation is secondary traumatic stress which is an occupational hazard for clinicians who care for traumatized patients. This stress results from helping or wanting to help traumatized or suffering patients, in this case, women during childbirth. Symptoms of secondary traumatic stress which parallel PTSD are described as well as prevalence rates of secondary traumatic stress in obstetrical clinicians’ experiences of attending traumatic births. The presentation concludes with implications for clinical practice.

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Presentations: 6  |  Hours / CE Credits: 6  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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South Africa Dr. Nils Bergman, MB ChB, MPH, MD

Dr Nils Bergman calls himself a Public Health Physician, and currently promotes and researches skin-to-skin contact on a fulltime basis.

He is an Honorary Senior Lecturer at the University of Cape Town, South Africa, and a research affiliate of the South African Medical Research Council.

Dr. Bergman was born in Sweden and raised in Zimbabwe, where he also later worked as a mission doctor. He received his medical degree (MB ChB) at the University of Cape Town, and later a Masters in Public Health at the University of the Western Cape. During his years in Zimbabwe he completed a doctoral dissertation (MD, equivalent to PhD) on scorpion stings. He has worked in rural South Africa, Zimbabwe and Sweden, and his last posting was Senior Medical Superintendent of Mowbray Maternity Hospital in Cape Town, overseeing 18000 births per year.

He enjoys sharing the wildlife of Africa with his wife and three youngsters.

South Africa Dr. Nils Bergman, MB ChB, MPH, MD
Abstract:

Our latest understanding of developmental neuroscience is based understanding epigenes. These are influenced by the earliest environment encountered, as the switches make “predictive adaptive responses”. These influence brain development as well as subsequent psychological and physiological health over the lifespan. Early gene expression makes the brain and its circuitry, and neuronal circuits are the essence of what we subsequently become: “we are our brains”. Cortisol is the most well known activator of the epigene, but it only does so when it can act unopposed for long periods of time. The “opposition” to cortisol comes from the combined effect of dopamine (the reward hormone) and oxytocin (the social hormone). Resilience is therefore about healthy dopamine and oxytocin circuits. It is mother’s presence that is required for the establishment of these. Preterm infants need resilience, and must have their mothers with them always.

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Presentations: 4  |  Hours / CE Credits: 4  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
Available in: Preterm Lecture Pack
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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Dr. Kendall-Tackett is a health psychologist, International Board Certified Lactation Consultant, and the Owner and Editor-in-Chief of Praeclarus Press, a small press specializing in women's health. Dr. Kendall-Tackett is Editor-in-Chief of two peer-reviewed journals: Clinical Lactation and Psychological Trauma. She is Fellow of the American Psychological Association in Health and Trauma Psychology, Past President of the APA Division of Trauma Psychology, and a member of the APA’s Publications and Communications Board and Journal Advisory Committee. Dr. Kendall-Tackett specializes in women's-health research including breastfeeding, depression, trauma, and health psychology, and has won many awards for her work including the 2019 Award for Outstanding Contributions to Trauma Psychology from the American Psychological Association’s Division of Trauma Psychology. Dr. Kendall-Tackett has authored more than 460 articles or chapters and is author or editor of 39 books. Her most recent books include: Depression in New Mothers, 3rd Edition (2017, Routledge UK), Women’s Mental Health Across the Lifespan (2017, Routledge US, with Lesia Ruglass), and The Phantom of the Opera: A Social History of the World’s Most Popular Musical (2018, Praeclarus).

Abstract:

A number of recent studies have raised questions about the way we understand depression in new mothers. For example, what is the role of depression in breastfeeding cessation and does mothers’ prenatal intention to breastfeed make a difference? Researchers have also found that epidurals lower the risk of depression, but the sample sizes are often small. Finally, a concerning trend has emerged regarding the link between depression, PTSD, and preterm birth. Women with depression or PTSD are at increased risk for preterm birth. The World Health Organization has recently identified preterm birth as the single greatest cause of infant mortality worldwide. These findings also have important implications for racial/ethnic disparities in both preterm birth and infant mortality. This presentation will summarize and synthesize these recent studies and present new findings from the Survey of Mothers’ Sleep and Fatigue that address the link between birth interventions and depression in mothers.

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Presentations: 6  |  Hours / CE Credits: 6  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks

When a Baby Dies: Providing Care and Support

By Vicki Culling, BA (Education); Master of Arts (Applied) in Social Work; PhD Women’s Studies.
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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New Zealand Vicki Culling, BA (Education); Master of Arts (Applied) in Social Work; PhD Women’s Studies.

Dr Vicki Culling is the Director and principal trainer for Vicki Culling Associates. Vicki is a bereaved parent and has been actively involved in Sands (an organisation that supports families when a baby or child dies) for over fifteen years. The stillbirth of her first daughter led her to utilise her skills, in supporting bereaved parents and families and educating health professionals with in-person workshops and online learning. Vicki was a founding member of the NZ national Perinatal and Maternal Mortality Review Committee (PMMRC) set up in 2005 and charged with collecting data on perinatal and maternal mortality and morbidity in NZ. Vicki is a current member of the NZ Ministry of Health’s Maternal Fetal Medicine Governance Board and vice-Chair of the National Perinatal Pathology Clinical Governance Committee. She also works as a lay reviewer for the Medical Council of NZ and the Dental Council of NZ. She lives in Wellington with her husband Kevan and daughter Phoebe.

New Zealand Vicki Culling, BA (Education); Master of Arts (Applied) in Social Work; PhD Women’s Studies.
Abstract:

In this presentation, we will explore grief and baby loss from a first-world, Western perspective. We will reflect on how our attitudes to grief have formed and look at the differences between traditional and contemporary approaches to grief and the tension that lies between them. We will also discuss some of the different ways that baby loss is discussed societally – looking particularly at platitudes, euphemisms and the tendency to minimize a baby’s death. We’ll finish with an exploration of our own approach to supporting bereaved families - our philosophy of care. At the end of this presentation, participants will have an array of concepts to help reflect on the care they give to parents and families who have experienced the tragedy of neonatal death.

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Presentations: 11  |  Hours / CE Credits: 11.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Available in: Neonatal Conference 2019
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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USA Diana Lynn Barnes, Psy.D, LMFT

Dr. Barnes is an internationally recognized expert on women’s reproductive mental health. A past president of Postpartum Support International, she currently sits on their President’s Advisory Board and is also a member of the Los Angeles County Perinatal Mental Health Task Force and the statewide Maternal Mental Health Collaborative. Her work has been published in a number of academic journals. She wrote the assessment and treatment guidelines for perinatal illness for the Perinatal Advisory Council of Los Angeles County. In addition to private practice, she is often retained by legal counsel on cases of infanticide, neonaticide and pregnancy denial. The 2009 recipient of a Lifetime Achievement Award presented by the Eli Lilly Foundation, Dr. Barnes is the co-author of The journey to parenthood: Myths, reality and what really matters (Radcliffe, 2007) and editor and contributing author to a reference text on Women’s reproductive mental health across the lifespan (Springer, 2014).

USA Diana Lynn Barnes, Psy.D, LMFT
Abstract:

Cultural ideology promotes the idea that pregnancy and childbirth are the happiest time in women’s lives; yet, there are more psychiatric admissions around the child-bearing years than at any other time in the female life cycle. Perinatal depression looks different in terms of its symptom presentation than other types of major depressive episodes and the psychological issues that determine treatment are unique to this phase of life, not only for the new mother, but for the entire family. This presentation focuses on symptom recognition, risk factors and treatment options looking at the impact of maternal depression on the developing mother-infant attachment.

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Presentations: 6  |  Hours / CE Credits: 6  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
This presentation is currently available through a bundled series of lectures.