Breastfeeding and Lactation

A wide range of presentations providing the latest evidence based information about human lactation, breastfeeding management, and breastfeeding advocacy and promotion.

Hours / Credits: 0.25 (details)
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Dr. Nomita Chandhiok is Senior Deputy Director General/Scientist ‘G’ at the Indian Council of Medical Research, the apex research organization and advisory body to the government of India. She is the programme officer for Women’s Health and HIV prevention technologies at the Council and responsible for coordinating and promoting programmatically relevant research in these areas. Specializing in Obstetrics and Gynecology, she has been involved in conducting multicentre clinical evaluation of newer reproductive health technologies and clinical and operational research studies in the field of sexual and Reproductive Health since 1981. Her keen involvement in issues related to the sexual and reproductive health of women and adolescents has led to several studies addressing the high maternal mortality and morbidity in India being translated into policy. Dr. Chandhiok is a member of several international advisory groups, professional bodies and Task Force committees of various scientific organizations and has over 60 publications in peer reviewed journals.

Abstract:

To determine the changes in the prevalence andkey determinants of timely initiation of complementary feeding among infants in India, secondary data analysis of two rounds of India’s National surveys conducted in the year 1992-93(NFHS-1)and 2005-06 (NFHS-3) was carried out. Early and timely introduction of complementary feeding at four and six months of age respectively are taken as the study variables and examined against demographic, socio-economic and health service availed variables using multinomial logistic regression along with multiple classification analysis.The early introduction of complementary feeding among 39% infants in NFHS-3 as compared to 30% in NFHS-1 is indicative of a worsening trend. Overall, there is a 10% increase in timely introduction of complementary feeding in NFHS-3 with 54% infants receiving it. Urban place of residence, higher educational attainment of mother, medium wealth index and perceived small size of baby at birth are associated with early introduction of complimentary feeding. Living in urban area, and perceived small size at birth are associated with timely complimentary feeding rates in both the surveys. Mothers being more literate, in non-gainful occupation and belonging to high wealth index were the other predictors associated with enhanced timely complimentary feeding in NFHS-1. While in NFHS-3, in infants of mothers who had availed health services like antenatal/natal care, there was a greater likelihood of timely introduction of complementary feeding.

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Presentations: 3  |  Hours / CE Credits: 0.75  |  Viewing Time: 2 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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USA Melissa Morgan, IBCLC, RLC, CLE

Melissa Morgan is a lactation consultant operating a robust private practice in Eastern Washington and North Idaho. She has also partnered with a thriving physician's group to provide contractional lactation care and provides lactation services and practitioner education in the public health setting.  She is studying health service administration with an emphasis on finance and has consulted with other IBCLCs in their efforts to establish in-clinic lactation services in the physician office. She and her husband are raising their three children in their self-built home in the foothills of the Rockies where she enjoys her warm/hot glass studio, snowshoeing, and berry picking.

Renee Beebe is a board certified lactation consultant with a busy private practice. She has been working in the field of lactation since the birth of her first child in 1990--as a La Leche League Leader, postpartum doula and IBCLC. Since becoming certified in 1997, Renee has supported moms through home, hospital and clinic visits, drop-in groups in the Seattle area and phone and tele-conferencing consultations internationally. In 2013, she began a contractual relationship with a naturopathic family practice clinic to provide lactation services. Renee is thankful to live in breastfeeding-friendly Seattle, close to her 2 grown daughters.

USA Melissa Morgan, IBCLC, RLC, CLE
Abstract:

The Affordable Care Act requires insurance companies to provide no-cost-sharing lactation benefits to mothers and babies.IBCLC is the premier professional to provide breastfeeding services, but the lack of broad state licensure for lactation consultants limits access to services, as Medicaid and most insurers will not directly cover unlicensed health care providers. Establishing IBCLC services in the physician’s clinic setting overcomes this limitation and allows for increased access to expert breastfeeding help. This presentation will equip IBCLCs and physicians with tools necessary to collaborate and implement a lactation program. Details regarding billing, financial arrangements, complementary care, marketing, etc., will be discussed. In the United States; there is an entire Facebook group devoted to this topic and the speakers regularly field questions about establishing this type of arrangement. Melissa and Renee will discuss two different models from their experience: one in an OB-GYN clinic and one in a naturopathic family medicine clinic.

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Presentations: 6  |  Hours / CE Credits: 6  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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Bobby Ghaheri, MD is a board certified ear, nose and throat specialist with The Oregon Clinic in Portland, OR. His interest in treating children with tongue and lip-tie stems from his ardent support of breastfeeding and was furthered by his personal experiences, as his youngest child benefited from treatment for it. He enjoys working with children and has an interest in traditional and non-traditional approaches to pediatric pain control. To communicate with him, feel free to email him at drghaheri@gmail.com or follow him on Twitter at @DrGhaheri.

Abstract:

While most breastfeeding problems can be managed effectively by a lactation consultant, situations arise where conservative interventions are ineffective in improving symptoms of a poor latch. Infant symptoms (aerophagia, poor weight gain, falling asleep prematurely, or frustration at the breast) or mother's symptoms (pain, engorgement, nipple damage) can often be explained by tongue-tie or lip-tie. I will explain effective diagnostic strategies and surgical interventions (scissors vs laser) in addressing these problems.

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Presentations: 6  |  Hours / CE Credits: 6.0  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
Available in: Tongue-tie Lecture Pack
Hours / Credits: 1.25 (details)
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U.S.A. Kathleen Kendall-Tackett, PhD, IBCLC, FAPA

Kathleen Kendall-Tackett is a health psychologist and International Board Certified Lactation Consultant, and the Owner and Editor-in-Chief of Praeclarus Press, a small press specializing in women's health. Dr. Kendall-Tackett is Editor-in-Chief of two peer-reviewed journals: Clinical Lactation and Psychological Trauma. She is Fellow of the American Psychological Association in Health and Trauma Psychology and Past President of the APA Division of Trauma Psychology. Dr. Kendall-Tackett specializes in women's-health research including breastfeeding, depression, trauma, and health psychology, and has won many awards for her work including the 2017 President’s Award for Outstanding Service to the Field of Trauma Psychology from the American Psychological Association’s Division of Trauma Psychology. Dr. Kendall-Tackett has authored more than 460 articles or chapters and is author or editor of 38 books.

U.S.A. Kathleen Kendall-Tackett, PhD, IBCLC, FAPA
Abstract:

Depression research contains many conclusions that appear to contradict each other regarding the role of breastfeeding. For example, breastfeeding lowers the risk of depression, but depression increases the risk that breastfeeding will fail. Moreover, breastfeeding problems increase women's risk of depression. These findings are not as contradictory as they may seem. By understanding the underlying physiological mechanism, we can understand these seemingly paradoxical findings. This presentation will describe the link between the stress and oxytocin systems, and how they relate to both maternal mental health and breastfeeding. When the stress system is upregulated, depression and breastfeeding difficulties follow. Conversely, when oxytocin is upregulated, maternal mental health and breastfeeding rates improve. This talk also includes the role of birth interventions and mother-infant sleep, as well as practical strategies that increase oxytocin.

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Presentations: 29  |  Hours / CE Credits: 27.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 0.5 (details)
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USA Bethany Sasaki, RN, IBCLC

Bethany Sasaki is an advanced practice nurse, lactation consultant and the co-founder of Midtown Lactation Consultants (MiLC). Her nursing background includes pediatrics, women’s health, emergency/trauma nursing and clinical research. She is currently completing the nurse midwifery program at Frontier Nursing University. She plans to continue conducting breastfeeding research focusing on nipple wounds and breast infections. Bethany and her husband Brent live in Sacramento California, USA with their 5 year old son named Leo and 3 year old daughter named Piper.

USA Bethany Sasaki, RN, IBCLC
Abstract:

Background: Use of lanolin has become a cultural norm while the evidence is conflicting on its safety and efficacy. Little to no evidence is available on the relationship between lanolin and infection.
Methods: This is a feasibility study, using case control retrospective chart review, examining lanolin use and the development signs and symptoms of nipple or breast infection in breastfeeding mothers with nipple pain. Fungal infection versus bacterial infection was suspected according to the corresponding effective treatment.
Results: Lanolin users were suspected to have a 62% infection rate, as compared to non-lanolin users at 18%, odds ratio 7.5 (2.4-23.4). Though not significant, fungal infection may have been more frequent than bacterial infection based on effective corresponding treatment.
Conclusion: A randomized control trial is called for to determine if frequent lanolin use increases the risk of nipple or breast infection.

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Presentations: 27  |  Hours / CE Credits: 25  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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United States Dr. Frank Nice, RPh, DPA,CPHP

Dr. Frank J. Nice has practiced as a consultant, lecturer, and author on medications and breastfeeding for over 40 years. He holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Pharmacy, a Masters Degree in Pharmacy Administration, Master’s and Doctorate Degrees in Public Administration, and Certification in Public Health Pharmacy. He retired after 43 years of government service, including 30 years of distinguished service with the US Public Health Service. He currently is self-employed as a consultant and President, Nice Breastfeeding LLC.

Dr. Nice has published Nonprescription Drugs for the Breastfeeding Mother, The Galactogogue Recipe Book, and Recreational Drugs and Drugs Used To Treat Addicted Mothers: Impact on Pregnancy and Breastfeeding. Dr. Nice has also authored over four dozen peer-reviewed articles on the use of prescription medications, recreational drugs, Over-the-Counter (OTC) products, and herbals during breastfeeding. He has organized and participated in over 50 medical missions to the country of Haiti.


United States Dr. Frank Nice, RPh, DPA,CPHP
Abstract:

Domperidone currently is used worldwide as an anti-nausea agent for adults, children, and women. It is currently available in 60 countries including Canada and Mexico. Domperidone was recently given orphan drug designation for the treatment of hypoprolactinemia in breastfeeding. Over 60,000 cases of hypoprolactinemia are reported annual in the United States. Infants who do not receive human milk cost the healthcare system over $13 billion each year and result in over 900 unnecessary infant deaths annually. Domperidone can produce significant increases in prolactin with subsequent increases in milk production. No drug is currently approved for the condition of hypoprolactinemia of lactation in any country.

This presentation will describe and explain the Orphan Drug Act and the steps necessary for domperidone to receive approval under the Act. Prolactin facts will be discussed as well as a review of the rare disease, hypoprolactinemia. The scientific rationale for the use of domperidone will be covered. Practical information will be presented on domperidone dosing and withdrawal of the drug with sufficient milk supply and with insufficient milk supply.

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Presentations: 28  |  Hours / CE Credits: 22.25  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 0.75 (details)
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Tarah Colaizy is a native Midwesterner, and attended undergraduate college and medical school at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. In an effort to see what else was out there, she completed her pediatric residency and her neonatology fellowship at Oregon Health & Sciences University in Portland, OR. During her time in Portland, Dr. Colaizy also earned an MPH degree in epidemiology, and became interested in breastfeeding and human milk as a research focus. Dr. Colaizy returned to the Midwest in 2004, as a faculty member of the University of Iowa. She has spent the past 11 years building a research career around breastfeeding and human milk nutrition issues in the very low birthweight population, with special focus in donor human milk. She is the Alternate Principal Investigator for the University of Iowa Center of the NICHD Neonatal Research Network, and is the PI of the MILK trial, a large multicenter randomized trial of the use of donor milk in ELBW infants. She loves playing games and reading with her two children and competes recreationally in the sport of Olympic Weightlifting.

Abstract:

  • Overview of trends in use in US NICUs
  • Donor milk nutritional composition
  • Donor milk and growth
  • Donor milk and developmental outcomes
  • Donor milk cytokines, chemokines, growth factors
  • Exclusive human milk and growth
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Presentations: 1  |  Hours / CE Credits: 0.75  |  Viewing Time: 2 Weeks
This presentation is currently available through a bundled series of lectures.