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Breastfeeding and Lactation

A wide range of presentations providing the latest evidence based information about human lactation, breastfeeding management, and breastfeeding advocacy and promotion.

Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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Dr. Joana Torres received her medical degree from the University of Coimbra, Portugal, and completed her fellowship in Gastroenterology at the Hospital Center of Coimbra, Portugal. She spent 3 years at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, NY, USA working on research projects in the field of IBD. She is currently working in Hospital Beatriz Ângelo, Loures, Portugal as a Gastroenterology Assistant and she is Adjunct Assistant Professor at Mount Sinai, NY. She is the President of the Scientific Committee of the Portuguese IBD Group and an active member of the European Crohn and Colitis Guideline committee (GuiCom). Her research focuses on populations at risk for developing inflammatory bowel disease with the goal of better understanding events taking place before the disease is diagnosed.

Abstract:

Inflammatory Bowel Disease is a chronic immune-mediated disease with increasing epidemiology. IBD results from a complex relationship between genetic susceptibility, environmental factors and intestinal microbiota, resulting in a self-perpetuating abnormal mucosal immune response. Increasing epidemiological evidence suggests that early life events and childhood exposures may be important for determining the risk of IBD. One of the most important early life exposures is diet: breastfeeding (BF) or formula feeding may impact microbiome development, which in turn may modulate immune system maturation. In this presentation I will review the benefits of BF, the evidence suggesting the role of BF in IBD, the impact of BF on the developing microbiome, and debate the issues of breastfeeding in patients with IBD.

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Presentations: 11  |  Hours / CE Credits: 11.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Available in: Neonatal Conference 2020
Hours / Credits: .75 (details)
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Dr. Maria Enrica Bettinelli is Lecturer of Pediatrics, University of Milan, Italy School of Medicine. As IBCLC since 2003, her research focuses on how overcoming barriers to implement breastfeeding support in the community and to promote mother and babies well-being in the perinatal period and the first years of life, adopting nurturing care approach. She has authored peer-reviewed publications on baby friendly community, breastfeeding rates in Lombardy, and the maternal and child health effects of lactation.
Her current research includes the clinical management of breastfeeding difficulties and how emotional experiences impact on breastfeeding decision. As Director of Milan Breastfeeding Network in Milan, Dr. Bettinelli leads an interdisciplinary team of clinicians, nurses and midwives that is developing new approaches to management of breastfeeding difficulties and to sharing breastfeeding education. Dr. Bettinelli is a member of the Italian Society of Pediatrics and Italian Society of Neonatology, chairs the Task Group of Education and Conference 2020 of ELACTA Board 2018-2020 and is a member of the ELACTA Board 2018-2020, and since 2012 is a member of the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine.
Dr. Bettinelli attended University of Milan School of Medicine where she graduated with her M.D. in 1986. She completed her Residency in Pediatrics in 1989 and in Neonatology in 1991 at University of Milan and went on to complete her medical experience at Mangiagalli Hospital in Milan. Dr. Bettinelli obtained her MSc in Perinatal Mental Health in 2019.
She lives in Milan, Italy with her husband and her daughter.


Abstract:

Breastfeeding, attachment, and perinatal mental disorders share the same neurobiological circuits and neurosciences have shown there are connections acting both in a protective and negative sense. Relational experiences in the early years of life put the basis for future physical and mental health. Avoiding early toxic stress is essential in preventing mental problems later. Maternal depression, and in general perinatal mental disorders of parental figures, especially of the mother, have a well-documented negative effect on infants and children, altering the mechanism of responsive interaction. Depressed mothers do not engage with their children and fail to respond to their signals. Children find this situation stressful, and there may be permanent effects arising from being raised by chronically depressed parents.
According to recent studies, breastfeeding helps reduce early toxic stress, as well as allowing optimal nutrition. The responsive interaction mode is the basis of the relationship established with breastfeeding. So breastfeeding has a significant impact on the mental health of children and adolescents. The way mothers respond to their children's needs is the key to understanding these long-term effects. When mothers respond consistently to the signals of their children, they lay the foundations for the resilience of their children. By understanding that the success of breastfeeding is linked to perinatal maternal mental health, we can create awareness when counseling the breastfeeding mother.


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Presentations: 6  |  Hours / CE Credits: 3.75  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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Belgium Katrien Nauwelaerts, IBCLC, BA, MA

Katrien Nauwelaerts works as a history-teacher since 2000 and graduated as a prehistoric archaeologist in 2005. She's the mother of three breastfed children and the administrator of the Dutch breastfeeding-website Borstvoeding Aardig, http://borstvoeding.aardig.be.

Katrien worked as a volunteer breastfeeding-counsellor, provincial coordinator and training manager for the Belgian breastfeeding-organisation Borstvoeding vzw between 2010-2014. In 2013 she became an IBCLC. Since than she's working as a lactation consultant and a nutritionist in private practice at the non-profit organisation Aardig Levenvzw.

Katrien often works with natural parents who choose for attachment parenting. She's doing research on full-term breastfeeding and is the administrator of a Dutch mothergroup for full-term breastfeeding-mothers on Facebook. Working with teenage mothers it's often on internet forums or in collaboration with the Public Centre for Social Welfare and municipality Herenthout, with the aim of supporting
disadvantaged families.

Belgium Katrien Nauwelaerts, IBCLC, BA, MA
Abstract:

The medical use of herbs is as old as mankind. In this lecture IBCLC and herborist Katrien Nauwelaerts explains the difference between the regular medical approach of breastfeeding problems and the more holistic solutions used in phytotherapy. Katrien Nauwelaerts explains how the use of herbs can support and sometimes even replace the more traditional clinical treatment of breastfeeding problems such as postpartum depression, low milk supply, oversupply, engorgement, breast infection, plugged ducts, mastitis, candidiasis, thrush, and Raynaud Syndrome etc.

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Presentations: 33  |  Hours / CE Credits: 32.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1.25 (details)
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United Kingdom Amy Brown, PhD, Professor

Professor Amy Brown is based in the Department of Public Health, Policy and Social Sciences at Swansea University in the UK. With a background in psychology, she has spent the last thirteen years exploring psychological, cultural and societal influences upon infant feeding decisions in the first year. Her research seeks to understand how we can shift our perception of how babies are fed away from an individual mothering issue to a wider public health problem – with societal level solutions. Dr Brown has published over 60 papers exploring the barriers women face in feeding their baby during the first year. She is a mother to three human children and three book babies: Breastfeeding Uncovered: Who really decides how we feed our babies, Why starting solids matters, and The Positive Breastfeeding Book: Everything you need to feed your baby with confidence. She is a regular blogger, aiming to change the way we think about breastfeeding, mothering and caring for our babies.

United Kingdom Amy Brown, PhD, Professor
Abstract:

The majority of women should be able to breastfeed, but elements of their experience are ultimately stopping them from doing so. Breastfeeding works best when done responsively but many psychological, social and cultural factors work directly or more subtly against responsive feeding, meaning that many mothers experience difficulties with breastfeeding which can lead to premature weaning. These factors can include separation of mother and baby, a lack of understanding of breast milk production, public attitudes and wider pressures of motherhood to name a few. If we want to support mothers to breastfeed we must understand and target these wider factors to create a supportive breastfeeding environment. It is important however that our approaches to breastfeeding promotion and education are perceived positively by mothers in order for them to be effective. In this presentation I’ll be addressing the common barriers to breastfeeding and their impact, along with new research that looks at how mothers perceive common breastfeeding education messaging and what this research tells us about how we can change our approach to ensure our messages have the intended impact.

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Presentations: 28  |  Hours / CE Credits: 25.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Presentations: 1  |  Hours / CE Credits: 1.25  |  Viewing Time: 2 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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United States Barbara D. Robertson, BA, MA, IBCLC, RLC

Barbara D. Robertson, IBCLC, has been an educator for over 29 years. She received a Bachelor’s degree in Elementary Education in 1988 and her Master’s in Education in 1995. Barbara left teaching elementary students in 1995 to raise her two children. Barbara is now the Director of The Breastfeeding Center of Ann Arbor. Barbara has developed a 90 hour professional lactation training, a 20 hour course which fulfills the "Baby Friendly" requirements, and is a speaker for hire on a wide variety of topics. Barbara volunteered for the United States Lactation Consultation Association as the Director of Professional Development for 4.5 years. She just retired as Associate Editor for Clinical Lactation, a journal she helped create for USLCA. Barbara has free podcasts, a blog, and Youtube videos which can all be found on her website bfcaa.com. She loves working with mothers and babies, helping them with breastfeeding problems in whatever way she can.

United States Barbara D. Robertson, BA, MA, IBCLC, RLC
Abstract:

Numbers are used all the time in the lactation field. Test weights, percentiles, % of weight gain, are just some of the information that is gathered to help make infant feeding decisions. But what are they really telling us? When are they useful? Using these numbers in a way that actually helps support and promotes breastfeeding are key. Appropriate infant weight gain, how to do a test weight, scale calibration, calculating infant intake, and the possible need for supplementation, will all be covered.

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Presentations: 6  |  Hours / CE Credits: 6  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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Australia Dr. Virginia Thorley, PhD, IBCLC, FILCA

Dr Virginia Thorley is a pioneer of the breastfeeding movement in Australia. She was the first breastfeeding counsellor in Queensland and in 1985 was in the first cohort in the world to certify IBCLC. In 2008 she was one of the first Fellows of the International Lactation Consultant Association (FILCA). She has two Research Higher Degrees in History (MA and PhD) and her current research interests include influences on mothers' infant-feeding decisions, wet-nursing, milk-sharing and milk banking. Dr Thorley is an Honorary Research Fellow in the School of HPRC at the University of Queensland. She is the author of several books and book chapters and most recently was co-editor, with Melissa Vickers, of The 10th Step & Beyond: Mother Support for Breastfeeding. She has presented at conferences on five continents.

Australia Dr. Virginia Thorley, PhD, IBCLC, FILCA
Abstract:

Surely breastfeeding can't save lives today? What's unsafe about 'formula' feeding in a resource-rich region? These are common beliefs. Breastfeeding provides the infant's entire food needs for the first six months. The protection of life afforded by human milk at any age is important – everywhere. A resource-rich region can suddenly become resource-poor when a natural disaster, extreme weather or major civil upheaval strikes. Factors impacting the artificially-fed infant's food security are:
- dependence on transport of supplies from afar
- dependence on electricity or other fuel for boiling water, cleansing equipment, refrigeration
- dependence on unsafe water for reconstituting powdered 'formula' and hygienic preparation
- lack of support and privacy for mothers to relactate or access donor milk
- donation of 'formula' supplies – undermining breastfeeding

I shall now describe real experiences where breastfeeding saved the day and hypothetical scenarios based on fact.

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Presentations: 28  |  Hours / CE Credits: 22.25  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Presentation Recording

Breastfeeding Children with Cancer

By Lyndsey Hookway, BSc, RNC, HV, IBCLC
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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United Kingdom Lyndsey Hookway, BSc, RNC, HV, IBCLC

Lyndsey is an experienced Paediatric Nurse, Health Visitor, International Board Certified Lactation Consultant, Holistic Sleep Coach and Birth Trauma Recovery Practitioner, with almost 20 years experience working with infants, children and families in hospitals, clinics, and the community.
Lyndsey runs a busy practice offering one-to-one specialist breastfeeding, bottle feeding, sleep, eating, behaviour and parenting support to families in the UK and Internationally. Lyndsey is a published author and respected speaker, trainer and mentor.
On a personal level, Lyndsey is also the mother of a child with cancer (now in remission), and the founder of the Breastfeeding the Brave project - a not-for-profit collaboration of parents who have breastfed their children through life threatening, terminal or life limiting illness.

United Kingdom Lyndsey Hookway, BSc, RNC, HV, IBCLC
Abstract:

Most children, happily, encounter no significant illness during childhood. Of those who do, some will be breastfed. Exclusive breastfeeding for 6 months, as well as continued breastfeeding alongside appropriate introduction of solid foods until the age of two years and beyond is recommended by the World Health Organisation. Breastfeeding is known to confer multiple well-documented protective properties, and the risks of not being breastfed are profound, even in well-developed countries.
Although breastfeeding reduces the overall risk of many serious childhood illnesses and malignancies, it is not a panacea. Many children who are breastfed optimally will still develop a serious health condition. This small group of children, and their families are an important population, with specific needs that are under-represented in policy, literature and professional training.
This presentation will identify specific childhood cancers, their prevalence and common treatments. It will also introduce some of the challenges experienced by parents breastfeeding their child through cancer, and some practical ways to support families facing this ordeal.

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Presentations: 6  |  Hours / CE Credits: 6  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1.25 (details)
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Dr. Kendall-Tackett is a health psychologist, International Board Certified Lactation Consultant, and the Owner and Editor-in-Chief of Praeclarus Press, a small press specializing in women's health. Dr. Kendall-Tackett is Editor-in-Chief of two peer-reviewed journals: Clinical Lactation and Psychological Trauma. She is Fellow of the American Psychological Association in Health and Trauma Psychology, Past President of the APA Division of Trauma Psychology, and a member of the APA’s Publications and Communications Board and Journal Advisory Committee. Dr. Kendall-Tackett specializes in women's-health research including breastfeeding, depression, trauma, and health psychology, and has won many awards for her work including the 2019 Award for Outstanding Contributions to Trauma Psychology from the American Psychological Association’s Division of Trauma Psychology. Dr. Kendall-Tackett has authored more than 460 articles or chapters and is author or editor of 39 books. Her most recent books include: Depression in New Mothers, 3rd Edition (2017, Routledge UK), Women’s Mental Health Across the Lifespan (2017, Routledge US, with Lesia Ruglass), and The Phantom of the Opera: A Social History of the World’s Most Popular Musical (2018, Praeclarus).

Abstract:

We do not live in a perfect world. Many new mothers have experienced abuse and adversity as children. They often wonder whether they will perpetuate the cycle of violence that they have experienced. They may also have a history of depression and wonder whether this has harmed their children. Fortunately, we can offer new mothers hope. Recent studies have found that breastfeeding helps mothers mother—even when there is a history of abuse. It not about the milk; it’s the physical act of breastfeeding. Breastfeeding improves maternal sleep, lowers the risk of depression, lessens anger and irritability, and even attenuates the negative effects of past sexual assault. Breastfeeding offers mothers a chance to do things differently—to be a different kind of parent. When it comes to overcoming adversity, breastfeeding makes all the difference.

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Presentations: 27  |  Hours / CE Credits: 25  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
This presentation is currently available through a bundled series of lectures.