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Breastfeeding and Lactation

A wide range of presentations providing the latest evidence based information about human lactation, breastfeeding management, and breastfeeding advocacy and promotion.

Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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India Effath Yasmin, MA, HDSE, CLEC(USA), IBCLC, BCST(ICSB-SWISS)

 

Effath Yasmin is India's leading IBCLC & a Biodynamic Craniosacral Therapist from Mumbai, India. Her special interests lie in Infant Oral and Sucking Dysfunction, Tongue Tie - Assessment, Treatment & Rehabilitation. Yasmin sits on many international and national boards. she also spear-headed many projects from co-founding a professional organisation ICAP with a central mission of advocacy & to unite the multidisciplinary professionals working in the field of tongue ties world wide to producing an international documentary - Untying Breastfeeding which has been screened atleast in 100 cities in the world. She has dedicated her life to many projects to educate, protect, promote and support & restore Breastfeeding & other craniofacial development across life span. Her work has been published in the International Journals & textbook and writes extensively on print and digital media on the subjects of breastfeeding, parenting, health & wellness and tongue ties. She continues to strive to pursue her seminal work on link between tongue ties and depression. She has currently set up India’s First Lactation & Family Wellness Clinic with FULL-DAY Breastfeeding observation facilities in Mumbai.

India Effath Yasmin, MA, HDSE, CLEC(USA), IBCLC, BCST(ICSB-SWISS)
Abstract:

An anatomical short, fibrotic or restricted lingual frenulum presents as Ankyloglossia impairing function for infants by way of breastfeeding difficulties. Although frenotomy is a simple surgical procedure to release the lingual restriction to help restore function, the surgery is only a smaller yet important piece of the puzzle of the treatment. The connective tissue forms the integrated milieu for several body systems in a human body. And since frenum is a part of this connective tissue and developmental & experiential compensation create complex creases along the fabric of fascial conductor network. These creases are noticed as structural, muscular, nerve compensations. Therefore a tongue tie is a complex clinical phenomenon that has many layers to it and needs a super wide vision of the Oral Ankylofrenula Team (OAT) to debate, plan, and mitigate treatment, support & rehabilitate. Craniosacral Biodynamic body work looks at this super wide vision that can allow gentle conduction of this orchestra of cellular events resulting in holistic shift and better treatment outcome.

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Presentations: 5  |  Hours / CE Credits: 5  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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USA Elizabeth Myler, BS, BSN, IBCLC, RLC

Beth is the owner and manager of Mahala Lactation and Perinatal Services and Breastfeeding Center in Northwest NJ. She is an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant (IBCLC) and a NJ licensed Registered Nurse (RN) with a bachelor of science degree in psychology and reproductive biology from Tulane University and a bachelor of science degree in nursing from The Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing. She began her clinical nursing career in pediatric and adolescent medicine at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and now has over 16 years of experience in the areas of reproductive biology, community and mental health, school nursing and maternal/child health.
Beth was a US Peace Corp Volunteer in French-speaking Cameroon, West Africa, where her passion for working with mothers and babies was born. Beth is an accredited La Leche League Leader (since 2006) and has trained as a birth and postpartum doula. She enjoys working with medically diverse mother/infant dyads, training and mentoring lactation consultants and interns. She enjoys writing for breastfeeding publications and speaking professionally, especially internationally, where she has the opportunity to learn about the diversity of breastfeeding experiences and share her knowledge. She also enjoys planning and hosting Mother Blessing ceremonies, an alternative to the traditional "baby shower," where expectant mothers are emotionally supported to explore their instinctive abilities to birth and breastfeed their babies.
Beth is currently attending Georgetown University’s Online Family Nurse Practitioner Program and will graduate in the Spring of 2017. She looks forward to having the privilege of incorporating her lactation expertise with comprehensive primary health care of the whole family.

USA Elizabeth Myler, BS, BSN, IBCLC, RLC
Abstract:

This talk includes a review of the stages of nipple wounds including terminology you will use as clinicians and breastfeeding care providers to describe and recommend treatments for mothers. With the use of vivid clinical pictures, we will review steps in the differential diagnosis of nipple wounds and the evidence base for various treatment options including palliative, over-the counter and prescription therapies.

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Presentations: 6  |  Hours / CE Credits: 6  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
Presentation Recording

Yes You Can! Breastfeeding A Baby With Down Syndrome

By Heather Miller, RN (Disability), Cert IV in Breastfeeding Education (Community)
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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Australia Heather Miller, RN (Disability), Cert IV in Breastfeeding Education (Community)

Educator with the Australian Breastfeeding Association (ABA). She has a particular interest in breastfeeding and Down syndrome after her son was born with Down syndrome in 2014. Her journey of breastfeeding her son included a long inpatient hospitalization stay due to his treatment for cancer. She has worked in disability services for over 20 years including community learning disability nursing in the UK, supporting GPs to manage the heath needs of people with complex health conditions and intellectual disability, medical undergraduate education in intellectual disability and currently works in general practice as a Practice Disability Nurse. Heather facilitates Breastfeeding Education Classes to expectant parents, is a Trainer & Assessor in ABA’s training team and provides guidance and contributes to publications on breastfeeding a baby with Down syndrome.

Australia Heather Miller, RN (Disability), Cert IV in Breastfeeding Education (Community)
Abstract:

As a health professional you may find yourself supporting a mother who is breastfeeding or requires support to breastfeed her baby with Down syndrome. Babies with Down syndrome can often have additional health needs, which may affect how successful they are with breastfeeding. Down syndrome or trisomy 21 is the most common genetic cause of intellectual disability for around 1 in 700 births worldwide. People with Down syndrome are not all the same but may have similar characteristic physical features, health and developmental challenges and some level of intellectual disability. Research has shown many benefits associated with breastfeeding a baby with Down syndrome. It contributes to establishing long term skill development, particularly with speech and feeding skills, as well as aiding brain growth. It also provides an opportunity for mother baby bonding during stressful periods after learning of their baby’s diagnosis. Regardless of these known benefits, some mothers may nevertheless be told their baby will not be able breastfeed. This presentation will explore some of the common challenges mothers may face when breastfeeding a baby with Down syndrome and tips on how to address these for the mother and baby. The material presented will also assist health professionals to support mothers with babies who may have similar health/developmental needs.

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Presentations: 6  |  Hours / CE Credits: 6  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
Presentations: 1  |  Hours / CE Credits: 1  |  Viewing Time: 2 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 0.75 (details)
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Belgium Katrien Nauwelaerts, IBCLC, BA, MA

Katrien Nauwelaerts works as a history-teacher since 2000 and graduated as a prehistoric archaeologist in 2005. She's the mother of three breastfed children and the administrator of the Dutch breastfeeding-website Borstvoeding Aardig, http://borstvoeding.aardig.be.

Katrien worked as a volunteer breastfeeding-counsellor, provincial coordinator and training manager for the Belgian breastfeeding-organisation Borstvoeding vzw between 2010-2014. In 2013 she became an IBCLC. Since than she's working as a lactation consultant and a nutritionist in private practice at the non-profit organisation Aardig Levenvzw.

Katrien often works with natural parents who choose for attachment parenting. She's doing research on full-term breastfeeding and is the administrator of a Dutch mothergroup for full-term breastfeeding-mothers on Facebook. Working with teenage mothers it's often on internet forums or in collaboration with the Public Centre for Social Welfare and municipality Herenthout, with the aim of supporting
disadvantaged families.

Belgium Katrien Nauwelaerts, IBCLC, BA, MA
Abstract:

Teenage mothers are perfectly able to breastfeed. Yet fewer young mothers initiate
breastfeeding compared with older mothers. And the ones who start with breastfeeding
switch more often over to formula during the first month postpartum.
Young mothers are more often influenced by their environment (family, friends) in their
feeding choice:
- Myths and prejudices about breastfeeding,
- Shame or fear of breastfeeding in public,
- Concerns about how to combine school and work,
- Latch-on- or pump problems.
Lack of confidence and low self-esteem are common in this group, so they often get
overruled by adults (grandparents, teachers, health workers) who "just want to help them"
and give formula advice.
Proper information, preferably in the form of peer counseling, is necessary to raise
breastfeeding rates among those youngsters.
Practical information is necessary, adapted to their specific situation of still-developing
adolescents and young mothers. Also needed, is awareness of the persons who will assist
in the education of her child: partner, mother, a good friend.
Training of healthcare workers and schoolteachers may also be needed, to clean up
prejudices about teenage-parenting and to ensure that she will be treated in a
breastfeeding-friendly way. If she can finish her education she gets more job
opportunities!
The school infrastructure, school curriculum, teachers and childcare-facilities have to be
flexible enough to support the choice to combine education and breastfeeding at the same
time.
Support and proper information throughout pregnancy and during the first six weeks
postpartum are crucial to make breastfeeding more likely to succeed. But ideally,
awareness occurs even though before a teenager is pregnant: as part of the health
education in schools!

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Presentations: 27  |  Hours / CE Credits: 25  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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U.S.A. Sarah McNamee, LCSW, MBA, IMH-E® Mentor (Clinical)

Sarah McNamee is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker and endorsed as an Infant Mental Health Mentor (Clinical). She is the Director/Owner of McNamee & Associates, LLC, a company that specializes in infant and early childhood mental health and supports families, communities, and providers through direct service, consultation, supervision/mentoring, and training. Sarah’s specialties include infant/early childhood mental health (with a focus on supporting families with baby/young child born premature, babies and young children with special health care needs, and highly sensitive babies/young children/parents), supporting infant regulation, reflective practice, and the provision of reflective supervision/consultation. Sarah is passionate about co-creating spaces that welcome the inherent wisdom and strength of individuals and communities in a trauma-informed and culturally responsive way. It is in these spaces that we discover the best tools we have for supporting individuals and communities, as well as changing our systems of care for babies, young children, and families. Sarah is the parent to three beautifully amazing and challenging human beings who continue to teach her the true meaning of intentional, attuned, and responsive caregiving.

U.S.A. Sarah McNamee, LCSW, MBA, IMH-E® Mentor (Clinical)
Abstract:

"Grounded in the concept that “how you are is as important in what you do"" (Pawl & St. John, 1998), this presentation will allow participants the chance to learn about and engage in reflective practice. Reflective practice is the discipline of regularly “stepping back” to consider the meaning of what has transpired in relationships, and to examine one’s professional and personal responses to these interactions for the purpose of determining further action. (Emde, et al., 2001) Best practice suggests that by consistently engaging in reflective practice, we are better equipped to do our work in a relationship-based, trauma-informed, culturally responsive way.

Our time together will begin with the exploration of the possible ways in which stress and dysregulation (as well as regulation) show up in our bodies, our work, and in our lives. Through the use of didactic instruction and experiential exercises, we will then spend time learning about and utilizing reflective practice to better understand how to best support our regulation and strengthen the connections we build with others including the parents and babies we serve. "

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Presentations: 6  |  Hours / CE Credits: 6  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
This presentation is currently available through a bundled series of lectures.