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Breastfeeding and Lactation

A wide range of presentations providing the latest evidence based information about human lactation, breastfeeding management, and breastfeeding advocacy and promotion.

Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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USA Diana West, BA, IBCLC

Diana West is an IBCLC in private practice. She is the co-author of “Sweet Sleep: Naptime and Nighttime Strategies for the Breastfeeding Family,” the 8th edition of La Leche League International’s “The Womanly Art of Breastfeeding,” “The Breastfeeding Mother’s Guide to Making More Milk,” the clinical monograph “Breastfeeding After Breast and Nipple Procedures,” and ILCA’s popular “Clinician’s Breastfeeding Triage Tool.” She is the author of the “Defining Your Own Success: Breastfeeding After Breast Reduction Surgery.” She is on the Editorial Review Board for the “Journal of Clinical Lactation,” a La Leche League Leader and the Director of Media Relations for La Leche League International. She has a bachelor’s degree in psychology and is the administrator of the popular BFAR.org, LowMilkSupply.org, and LactSpeak.com websites. She lives with her three sons and one husband in the picturesque mountains of western New Jersey in the United States.

USA Diana West, BA, IBCLC
Abstract:

What do mothers really think about the services they receive from their lactation consultant? What do they want but aren’t getting? This session presents the results of a high volume survey of mothers’ opinions about IBCLC services. The answers will help participants focus their practice for better effectiveness, clinical outcomes, and client satisfaction.

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Presentations: 1  |  Hours / CE Credits: 1  |  Viewing Time: 2 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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Sonia Semenic is an Associate Professor at the Ingram School of Nursing, McGill University (Montreal, Quebec, Canada) and a Nurse Scientist at the McGill University Health Center. After many years of experience as an IBCLC and Clinical Nurse Specialist in maternal-child health, Sonia completed a PhD in Nursing and postdoctoral training in community health. Her research aims to better understand the process of knowledge translation (KT) in perinatal health, with a particular focus on the implementation of evidence-based practices to protect, promote and support breastfeeding. She currently co-leads the Knowledge Translation Platform for the Quebec Nursing Intervention Research Network, and teaches graduate courses on knowledge translation in nursing practice.

Abstract:

Despite irrefutable research evidence for the benefits of breastfeeding, less than 37% of infants worldwide meet WHO targets for optimal breastfeeding. Persistently low breastfeeding rates are due in part due to poor uptake of breastfeeding best-practice guidelines, such as the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative. The growing field of knowledge translation in healthcare reveals that it takes from 8-30 years for research findings to be adopted into clinical practice, and that up to 45% of patients don’t receive evidence-based healthcare. This presentation aims to help those providing lactation support to better understand the complexity of factors influencing the use of evidence in practice, as well as what can be done to facilitate the uptake of best practice guidelines to protect, promote and support breastfeeding. Whether or not care providers follow evidence-based practices is influenced by the nature of the evidence (e.g., perceived relevance of the evidence), characteristics of the care providers (e.g., motivations to change practice) as well as characteristics of the care environment (e.g., leadership support for change). Successful strategies for supporting practice change are tailored to local barriers and facilitators to evidence use, and can be informed by the growing number of theoretical models and frameworks for KT in healthcare.

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Presentations: 33  |  Hours / CE Credits: 32.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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USA Laurel Wilson, IBCLC, RLC, BSc, CLE, CCCE

Laurel Wilson, IBCLC, BSc,CLE, CCCE, CLD, is an international speaker, pregnancy and breastfeeding specialist, consultant, and author. Laurel is the co-author of two books, The Attachment Pregnancy and The Greatest Pregnancy Ever and the contributing author to Round the Circle. She loves to blend today's recent scientific findings with the mind/body/spirit wisdom. She serves on the Board of Directors for the United States Breastfeeding Committee, a Senior Advisor for CAPPA, and is on the Advisory Board for InJoy Health. Laurel has been joyfully married to her husband for more than two and a half decade and has two wonderful grown sons, whose difficult births led her on a path towards helping emerging families create positive experiences. She believes that the journey into motherhood is a life-changing rite of passage that should be deeply honored and celebrated.

USA Laurel Wilson, IBCLC, RLC, BSc, CLE, CCCE
Abstract:

As the recreational and medicinal use of marijuana increases around the world, the potential for babies to be impacted by this herb during breastfeeding increases exponentially. In the United States, several states have recently legalized or are on the path to legalizing the consumption of marijuana (cannabis). This trend has led to more lactation consultants and healthcare professionals being faced with the question, "Is it safe for me to use marijuana while I breastfeed?" The answers given vary widely and this is due largely to myth, bias, and poorly conducted and accessed research. The Medications and Mother's Milk Guide considers cannabis to be an L5, contraindicated for breastfeeding while Lactnet states that it is preferable for users to continue breastfeeding and yet minimize the baby's exposure to smoke. These widely differing recommendations lead healthcare professionals to scratch their heads and face the knowledge that they just don't know what to say to mothers. Additionally, there are reports of social services removing babies from homes due to mother's marijuana use while breastfeeding. This presentation looks at the most recent research and policies surrounding this controversial herb

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Presentations: 27  |  Hours / CE Credits: 25  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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United States Angela Bond, PhD, MS

Dr. Bond is a trained laboratory and social scientist currently studying the social and public health impacts of shared human milk. Specific areas of interest include development of the microbiome of the infant, immunological responses from the parent and infant, impacts of non-parental human milk on development of the immune response and microbiome, and risk abatement practices by participants in private arrangement milk sharing. She has been specifically trained in health disparities sciences and engages in research with a perspective on social justice, gender equity, and health equity. As a Hawaiian and Cherokee heritage scholar, she has a particular passion for colonial impacts on infant care and feeding practices.

United States Angela Bond, PhD, MS
Abstract:

In the absence of adequate banked donor human milk for distribution to all infants in need, many families choose to engage in the practice of Private Arrangement Milk Sharing (PAMS), partially facilitated through social media, to procure human milk for their infants. Evidence regarding the participant and infant characteristics, and risk abatement practices is limited. This presentation explores the state-of-the-science of PAMS, characteristics of recipient participants and infants, donor screening practices, and risk abatement strategies. Results are contextualized with a socioecological framework of factors affecting infant feeding practices. Influence of health care providers, lactation support, birth attendant, and sources sought during decision making and the impact of these influences on supporting families are discussed.

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Presentations: 6  |  Hours / CE Credits: 6  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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United States Ellen Lechtenberg, MPH, RD, IBCLC

Ellen is the lactation services manager at Intermountain Healthcare Primary Children’s Hospital. She has a Master’s Degree in Public Health Nutrition, is a Registered Dietitian and an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant. Ellen has the unique advantage of using her nutrition knowledge as a lactation consultant. She has a passion for providing human milk for patients with nutritional challenges such as chylothorax and colitis. Her work on fat free human milk is published and has received national review. One of her career goals is to increase knowledge of nurses and healthcare providers regarding human milk immunology and breastfeeding thus improving lactation duration. Ellen has worked with the special needs breastfeeding dyad for the past 20 years at Primary Children’s Hospital to promote breastfeeding and human milk feeding. She designed, set up and manages the Mothers Milk Center at Primary Children’s hospital which opened in 2015. Ellen has presented at local, state and national meetings. She also has experience working at a corporate level with lactation consultants developing breastfeeding policies and protocols as well as lactation education programs for nurses and health care professionals.

United States Ellen Lechtenberg, MPH, RD, IBCLC
Abstract:

Neurologic conditions often have a significant impact on the breastfeeding/chestfeeding dyad. The majority of these conditions are congenital, however some may be acquired during the first year of life. Breastfeeding/chestfeeding management of the hypotonic and hypertonic infant will be discussed. Hypotonic neurologic conditions that will be reviewed include floppy infant syndrome, infantile botulism, medullary lesions, Prader-Willi Syndrome and Trisomy 13, Trisomy 18 and Trisomy 21. The hypertonic neurologic conditions cerebral palsy and drug exposed infant will be discussed along with neural tube defects and Congenital Zika Syndrome. Case studies of special needs babies with these neurologic conditions will be presented.

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Presentations: 6  |  Hours / CE Credits: 6  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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Tom Johnston is unique as a midwife and lactation consultant and the father of eight breastfed children. Recently retired after 27 years in the US Army, he is now an Assistant Professor of Nursing at Methodist University where he teaches, among other things, Maternal-Child Nursing and Nutrition. You may have heard him at a number of conferences at the national level, to include the Association of Woman’s Health and Neonatal Nurses (AWHONN), the International Lactation Consultant’s Association (ILCA), or perhaps at dozens of other conferences across the country. In his written work he routinely addresses fatherhood and the role of the father in the breastfeeding relationship and has authored a chapter on the role of the father in breastfeeding for “Breastfeeding in Combat Boots: A survival guide to breastfeeding in the military”.

Abstract:

It has been 10 years since the Microbiome burst on the scene. In that time there has been a huge interest in the microbial world of the maternal-infant dyad. There appears to be a symbiotic microbial interplay between the two that has been playfully dubbed “The Oro-boobular-axis”. There is now solid evidence that the mother passes her microbiome to the infant as it passes through the birth canal and breastfeeds. There is also evidence that the baby passes their microbiome to the mother through “Retrograde inoculation”. This new understanding of human lactation is beginning to offer explanations to how some of the magic “benefits” of breastfeeding may actually be happening at a cellular and microbial level. It isn’t as well understood as some would have you believe, but it is an exciting new world to explore.

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Presentations: 5  |  Hours / CE Credits: 6  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Presentations: 5  |  Hours / CE Credits: 6  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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USA Melissa Cole, IBCLC, RLC

Melissa Cole, MS, IBCLC, RLC is a board certified lactation consultant, neonatal oral-motor assessment professional, and clinical herbalist in private practice. Melissa has been passionate about providing comprehensive, holistic lactation support and improving the level of clinical lactation skills for health professionals for over a decade. She enjoys teaching, researching and writing about wellness and lactation-related topics. Melissa holds a bachelor of science degree in maternal child health and lactation consulting and her master’s work is in therapeutic, clinical herbalism. Melissa actively conducts research and collaborates with several lactation and health care professional associations.

Before pursuing a path in lactation, Melissa lived and studied in Japan. She was also a language instructor for almost a decade. From this background in culture and education sprung a deep love of supporting and educating families. Melissa also has an extensive background in herbal studies and holistic health. When not helping parents and babies, Melissa can probably be found lecturing, researching, writing, or attending a conference; she is passionate about health and lactation, to say the least!

USA Melissa Cole, IBCLC, RLC
Abstract:

A hotly debated topic among tongue tie professionals is pre and post-frenotomy care. Infants may have varying degrees of suck dysfunction and lip/ tongue mobility issues before and even after release. In addition, wound care of the incision sites, structural support, emotional support for the dyad and optimal feeding care plan formation is vital. Melissa Cole, IBCLC, RLC will present some pre and post-frenotomy case studies and care basics from her own clinical practice that have proven to improve frenotomy healing outcomes. Parents are often exhausted from the physical and emotional roller coaster that feeding a tongue/lip tied infant presents and sensitive care for the whole family is needed. Melissa also recognizes that pre and post-frenotomy care ‘best practice’ is still in its infancy and she proposes a call to research this subject matter further

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Presentations: 6  |  Hours / CE Credits: 6.0  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
Available in: Tongue-tie Lecture Pack
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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U.S.A. Nancy Wight, MD, IBCLC, FABM, FAAP

Nancy is an attending Neonatologist with San Diego Neonatology, Inc. and is the Medical Director for Sharp HealthCare Lactation Services. She is board-certified in Pediatrics and Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine and has been an IBCLC since 1988. She is currently secretary/treasurer, education coordinator and web site co-editor for the San Diego County Breastfeeding Coalition, which she helped found. Nancy is the Breastfeeding Coordinator for District IX, Chapter 3 of the American Academy of Pediatrics. She is a past president of the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine, and on the ILCA and HMBANA Advisory Boards. Her book, “Best Medicine: Human Milk in the NICU” was published in July 2008. She was awarded a 2014 Golden Wave Award by the California Breastfeeding Coalition for her efforts to reduce obstacles to breastfeeding in California. On a personal level, she is the wife of an architect/lawyer, mother of a 23 yr old (formerly breastfed) son, and mother to 4 golden retrievers and 1 cat.

U.S.A. Nancy Wight, MD, IBCLC, FABM, FAAP
Abstract:

The benefits of human milk for term infants are well recognized. Human milk is species-specific and has been adapted through evolution to meet the needs of the human infant, supporting growth, development, and survival. It has only been in the very recent past that significantly preterm infants have survived and that attention has been paid to the crucial role of nutrition in the long-term outcomes for these infants. Human milk is a complex fluid that simultaneously provides nutrients and bioactive components that facilitate the adaptive, functional changes required for the optimal transition from intrauterine to extrauterine life. Preterm infants suffer not only from gastrointestinal immaturity, but also from functional immaturity of all organs and physiologic systems, as well as specific illnesses and complications, which further confound their transition from fetus to newborn. We will discuss the goals and methods of providing appropriate nutrition for NICU infants to promote optimal short and long term outcomes.

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Presentations: 4  |  Hours / CE Credits: 4  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
Available in: Preterm Lecture Pack
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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U.S.A. Marsha Walker, RN, IBCLC

Marsha is a registered nurse and international board certified lactation consultant. She has been assisting breastfeeding families in hospital, clinic, and home settings since 1976. Marsha is the executive director of the National Alliance for Breastfeeding Advocacy: Research, Education, and Legal Branch (NABA REAL). As such, she advocates for breastfeeding at the state and federal levels. She served as a vice president of the International Lactation Consultant Association (ILCA) from 1990-1994 and in 1999 as president of ILCA. She is a board member of the Massachusetts Breastfeeding Coalition, the US Lactation Consultant Association, and Baby Friendly USA, USLCA’s representative to the USDA’s Breastfeeding Promotion Consortium, and NABA REAL’s representative to the US Breastfeeding Committee. Marsha is an international speaker, and an author of numerous publications including ones on the hazards of infant formula use, Code issues in the US, and Breastfeeding Management for the Clinician: Using the Evidence.

U.S.A. Marsha Walker, RN, IBCLC
Abstract:

Sore nipples are the bane of breastfeeding mothers. Nipple pain and/or damage is one of the top reasons for the early abandonment of breastfeeding. There are a large number of suggested remedies, many of which have little or no high quality evidence to recommend their use. This presentation will explore the structure of the nipple, potential screening tools for sore nipples, contributors to sore nipples, antenatal interventions, flat and inverted nipples, colonization and infection of the nipples, biofilms, small colony variants of Staphylococci aureus, and a plethora of pharmaceutical and non-pharmaceutical treatments to relieve pain and hasten healing.

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Presentations: 28  |  Hours / CE Credits: 22.25  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
This presentation is currently available through a bundled series of lectures.