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Breastfeeding and Lactation

A wide range of presentations providing the latest evidence based information about human lactation, breastfeeding management, and breastfeeding advocacy and promotion.

Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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USA Michelle Emanuel, OTR/L, CIMI, CST, NBCR, RYT 200

Michelle has 20 years of experience as a Neonatal / Pediatric Occupational Therapist and over 15 years experience as a Craniosacral Therapist and Infant Massage Instructor. She is a Certified CranioSacral Therapist through the Upledger Institute. She serves as a Teacher's Assistant) for CranioSacral Therapy, SomatoEmotional Release , as well as CranioSacral Therapy for Pediatrics. In addition to this, Michelle has a wide variety of specialty baby craniosacral therapy training and experience. She is certified in Yoga, Reflexology, and infant Massage. Michelle has started to focus on her private practice, teaching her own curriculum including the Tummy Time method and and cranial nerve dysfunction for the newborn to precrawling infant.

USA Michelle Emanuel, OTR/L, CIMI, CST, NBCR, RYT 200
Abstract:

Interoception is a term used to describe our nervous system's awareness of the sensations from the gastrointestinal and visceral system, as well as the primary sensory part/input to baby's Autonomic Nervous System. ANS function and regulation underlay all automatic processes of the body, from heart beat to breastfeeding and digestion function, as well as maintaining a calm state in order to engage in social interaction or to transition easily in and out of sleep. More simply put, interoception is "feelings from the body". In addition to visceral information, interoceptive pathways carry information related to affective touch, itch, temperature and pain and are delivered to a separate area of the brain, the insular cortex, which also contains a map of the body, similar to the well known homunculus. Interception plays a large role in dynamic equilibrium and autonomic regulation of tissues of the body. Interoceptive information and the processing is the basis of all important activity to optimize energy utilization. This system is often compromised in babies who present with complex oral dysfunction, tethered oral tissues, postural asymmetries, fussiness, gas, reflux or other dysregulation in function. How babies feel is mirrored in how they function, compromised function equals compromised interoceptive processing. This talk covers the basics of this system and practical clinical applications for precrawling babies to optimize neurodevelopment and breastfeeding abilities.

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Presentations: 3  |  Hours / CE Credits: 3  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
Presentations: 1  |  Hours / CE Credits: 1  |  Viewing Time: 2 Weeks
Hours / Credits: .75 (details)
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U.S.A. Cynthia Good, MS, LMHCA, IBCLC, CATSM

Cynthia Good, MS Clinical Psychology, is an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant, Clinical Counselor, author, consultant, and internationally recognized speaker. She is the Director of LifeCircle Consulting, LLC and is Certified in Acute Traumatic Stress Management. She is based in the Seattle, Washington, USA area, where she formerly served as an Adjunct Professor in the Department of Midwifery at Bastyr University where she taught counseling skills and is a therapist at Sandbox Therapy Group where she works with children, adults, and families. Cynthia has a strong interest in the emerging field of lactational psychology. She brings the evidence and insights of psychology and lactation consulting to her presentations, providing information and teaching skills that are essential to understanding and effectively responding to the complex psychosocial realities of families living in diverse contexts. The focus of her presentations includes communication skills and counseling techniques for perinatal care providers; equity, diversity, and inclusion; infant feeding rhetoric; perinatal mental health; perinatal loss, grief, and trauma; ethics; serving as an expert witness in lactation-related court cases; cultural competence and humility; vitamin D; and more.

U.S.A. Cynthia Good, MS, LMHCA, IBCLC, CATSM
Abstract:

Up to one third of mothers report experiencing birth trauma and postpartum symptoms of traumatic stress. Birth is traumatic when mothers experience or perceive a threat to life, serious injury, or threat to physical integrity (for themselves or their baby) or experience the death of their baby. Pre-existing risk factors and birth-related risk factors for traumatic birth are staggeringly common. Childbirth trauma and postpartum traumatic stress negatively impacts mothers and their babies, and can result in the undermining of breastfeeding, additional grief over the loss of breastfeeding, and increased health risks for mother and baby. This session offers a sensitive discussion of how traumatic birth experiences affect maternal mental health, mothering, breastfeeding, and lactation consulting. It includes the importance of recognizing the difference between postpartum depression and postpartum stress disorders in new mothers, screening mothers for traumatic stress, and referring potentially traumatized mothers for diagnosis and possible treatment.

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Presentations: 28  |  Hours / CE Credits: 22.25  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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United States Dixie Whetsell, MS, IBCLC

Dixie Whetsell, MS, IBCLC, has a Master’s Degree in Community Health Education from the University of Oregon. She began working with breastfeeding families in 1992 and became an IBCLC in 1998. She has worked as a lactation consultant in a variety of settings including private practice, county and state public health programs and high risk maternal and pediatric hospitals. She began teaching lactation training courses in 2003 and is currently an adjunct faculty member teaching in the Pathway 2 Lactation Training Program in the OHSU-PSU School of Public Health at Portland State University. She is a past presenter for the GOLD Perinatal Conference. She is an active member of the Oregon Washington Lactation Association, the US Lactation Consultant Association and the International Lactation Consultant Association. She was a founding Board Member for Northwest Mothers Milk Bank, a HMBANA non-profit donor milk bank.

Lisa Gonzales, BSN, RN, IBCLC earned her Bachelor of Science in Nursing from Linfield College. She started her nursing career as a Labor and Delivery nurse at a Level III OB hospital in 2006. After having her first baby, Lisa pursued lactation education and became an IBCLC in 2013. She made full career change in 2015 to become a lactation nurse in a high risk maternity and pediatric hospital, providing inpatient and outpatient consults to growing families. She is an active member of the Oregon Washington Lactation Association, the US Lactation Consultant Association and the International Lactation Consultant Association. Lisa currently helps families during in-home visits with her private practice.

United States Dixie Whetsell, MS, IBCLC
Abstract:

This case describes a 32-year-old primiparous woman who experienced an anaphylactic reaction associated with breastfeeding and milk expression on postpartum day four. With each episode her symptoms worsened and she developed hives, edema and difficulty breathing and swallowing. She had to be treated for her anaphylactic reaction in a hospital ER and ICU and she was released on postpartum day five on antihistamines.

Lactation anaphylaxis is a very rare condition that was first reported in the scientific literature in 1991. Since then there have been 11 other reported cases. Lactation anaphylaxis can be life-threatening and symptoms can include a rash, hives, edema resulting in difficulty breathing or swallowing, a dangerous decrease in blood pressure and a loss of consciousness. We will review this case and do a brief review of the previous case reports. We will discuss the possible causes for lactation anaphylaxis, the related risk factors, common treatments and possible breastfeeding outcomes. In most cases with proper treatment and management breastfeeding and milk expression can continue. Enhanced awareness of and knowledge about this rare condition will allow lactation consultants and other members of the health care team to better support breastfeeding parents who experience lactation anaphylaxis.

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Presentations: 33  |  Hours / CE Credits: 32.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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us Kathy Parkes, MSN-Ed, BSPsy, RN, IBCLC, RLC, FILCA

Kathy Parkes is a registered nurse, IBCLC, and Fellow of the International Lactation Consultant Association (FILCA) with over 30 years of experience in lactation management and education. She has been actively involved with breastfeeding coalitions at the local, state, and international levels. Now a published author, her first book, “Perspectives in Lactation: Is Private Practice for Me?”, sold out the first printing in only 48 hours. Kathy has worked in multiple lactation settings, including the hospital, private practice, education, home health care, and in the US-based Women, Infant, and Children (WIC) program. As a Certified Compassion Fatigue Educator, Kathy heads the Perinatal Loss Program at her hospital, and leads a Griefshare program in the community. Happily married for 39 years, she has 2 daughters, and 3 grandchildren, all breastfed.

us Kathy Parkes, MSN-Ed, BSPsy, RN, IBCLC, RLC, FILCA
Abstract:

Professionals working with new mothers and infants are drawn to the field by compassion. However, when a loss occurs, whether prenatally or following birth, many of us are unprepared to deal with the loss ourselves, or in assisting the family. One of the many decisions that needs to be made in this time of grief is how the mother will deal with lactogenesis II, the surge of breast milk at two to four days. This session will provide an overview of anatomy and physiology of milk production, and discuss various choices the mother can make regarding how she will deal with the milk supply that occurs. To close the session, the speaker will briefly discuss self-care for professionals to aid recovery from such a loss.

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Presentations: 6  |  Hours / CE Credits: 6  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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Japan Tomoko Seo, MD, IBCLC, FABM

Tomoko Seo is a pediatrician and IBCLC in Japan, working in a private clinic with colleagues including IBCLCs who practice's general pediatrics and breastfeeding medicine. She became certified as an IBCLC in 1999 and recertified in 2004, 2009, 2014 and 2019. She is a member of the Japanese Association of Lactation Consultants (JALC) since 1999, when it was founded. JALC has been holding conferences several times a year, including the “Annual Breastfeeding Seminar for Physicians” since 2005 to provide breastfeeding education to physicians and improve breastfeeding support among physicians. Tomko has been a member of the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine (ABM) since 1999. She is also an active member of the International, Protocol, Education, Conference, Membership Committees of ABM.

Japan Tomoko Seo, MD, IBCLC, FABM
Abstract:

Breastfeeding facilitates good health in infants and mothers, and for all humans throughout life. Medical professionals should be advocates for breastfeeding, and physicians could be one of the most influential advocates. However, many medical students, residents and physicians have very limited opportunities to learn about breastfeeding and human lactation during their medical education. From another point of view, breastfeeding is a private experience as well as a scientific matter. If a physician or a partner successfully breastfeeds, she/he may become a more effective advocate for breastfeeding. So, it is imperative to provide medical students, residents, and young physicians with education about breastfeeding and to enable them to experience successful breastfeeding personally, in order for them to promote and support breastfeeding among their patients.

The Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine is an international organization of physicians who protect, promote, and support breastfeeding, and one of its goals is to develop and disseminate the standard for physician education around breastfeeding and human lactation. ABM has developed protocols and statements for health care providers to utilize for breastfeeding management.

The WHO/UNICEF revised Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding in 2018, includes in Step2 “Ensure that staff have sufficient knowledge, competence and skills to support breastfeeding”. This included physician education. There are many ways to educate physicians, and ABM materials could be one option.

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Presentations: 33  |  Hours / CE Credits: 32.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: .5 (details)
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I am a wife and mother of two breastfed children. I was a general practitioner and am currently more focused on helping mothers to breastfeed. I work at Puri Cinere Hospital and Kemang Medical Care Women and Children as a lactation counselor. I currently on leave due to accompany my husband school in United State for his PhD programs. Since 2009, I've been helping mothers who have difficulties breastfeeding. It is a delight when we meet during tough times, then met again once their breastfed child are big and smart, and most importantly successfully breastfed. My desire is to help mothers to breastfed wherever I live in this world.

Abstract:

Good doctor–patient communication is essential for positive health care outcomes. Ideal doctor–patient communication generally is reflected in a partnership communication style. However, in Southeast Asian settings, we often see a more one-way style with little input from the patient. Helpline services is breaking the ice, and is considered a new option modality for patients in Indonesia. The ease in contacting medical professionals through phone and text messages seems more comfortable, personal and inexpensive.
Breastfeeding support via a helpline helps mother to feel reassured, confident and more determined to continue breastfeeding, and in majority of occasions resolves their particular concerns.
Lactation Clinic in Puri Cinere Hospital, Depok, West Java, Indonesia was established in August 2011 and operated a helpline since the beginning of its establishment. Helpline service is open 24 hours daily, through phone, text messages, whatsapp, or blackberry messenger directly to doctors who are also breastfeeding counselors. There are six doctors who take turns every month to receive calls and reply to messages. Helpline numbers are distributed to patients during post natal rounds or at patients doctors appointments in lactation clinic.
A longitudinal study conducted in March to December 2014 shows 202 helpline cases in 9 months. There were 29 cases (14%) questioning EBM handling, 24 cases (12%) asking about complementary feeding, 19 cases (9%) of infant stool, 19 cases (9%) medication and mother's milk, 15 cases (7%) frenotomy after care and other various problems. 63% cases were successful managed via helpline, and 37% cases were referred to the Lactation Clinic to get further help.
There were many cases resolved through helpline calls and messages. High success rate of helpline management shows that helpline program is effective to help mothers and resolved their particular concerns; especially in Indonesia.

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Presentations: 28  |  Hours / CE Credits: 25.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Presentations: 1  |  Hours / CE Credits: 0.5  |  Viewing Time: 2 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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Catherine Watson Genna BS, IBCLC is an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant in private practice in New York City. Certified in 1992, Catherine is particularly interested in helping moms and babies breastfeed when they have medical challenges and is an active clinical mentor. She speaks to healthcare professionals around the world on assisting breastfeeding babies with anatomical, genetic or neurological problems. Her presentations and her writing are enriched by her clinical photographs and videos. Catherine collaborates with Columbia University and Tel Aviv University Departments of Biomedical Engineering on research projects investigating the biomechanics of the lactating nipple and various aspects of sucking and swallowing in breastfeeding infants. She is the author of Selecting and Using Breastfeeding Tools: Improving Care and Outcomes (Praeclarus Press 2009) and Supporting Sucking Skills in Breastfeeding Infants (Jones and Bartlett Learning 2008, 2013, 2017) as well as professional journal articles and chapters in the Core Curriculum for Lactation Consultant Practice and Breastfeeding and Human Lactation. Catherine served as Associate Editor of the United States Lactation Consultant Association’s official journal Clinical Lactation for its first seven years.

Abstract:

Infants with biologically based sucking problems can often breastfeed with specific lactation management and supportive techniques. This presentation provides an overview of some common medical problems that cause feeding difficulty and strategies that can help an infant with suboptimal sucking skills to feed more normally.

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Presentations: 6  |  Hours / CE Credits: 6  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
This presentation is currently available through a bundled series of lectures.