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Breastfeeding and Lactation

A wide range of presentations providing the latest evidence based information about human lactation, breastfeeding management, and breastfeeding advocacy and promotion.

Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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USA Laurel Wilson, IBCLC, RLC, BSc, CLE, CCCE

Laurel Wilson, IBCLC, BSc,CLE, CCCE, CLD, is an international speaker, pregnancy and breastfeeding specialist, consultant, and author. Laurel is the co-author of two books, The Attachment Pregnancy and The Greatest Pregnancy Ever and the contributing author to Round the Circle. She loves to blend today's recent scientific findings with the mind/body/spirit wisdom. She serves on the Board of Directors for the United States Breastfeeding Committee, a Senior Advisor for CAPPA, and is on the Advisory Board for InJoy Health. Laurel has been joyfully married to her husband for more than two and a half decade and has two wonderful grown sons, whose difficult births led her on a path towards helping emerging families create positive experiences. She believes that the journey into motherhood is a life-changing rite of passage that should be deeply honored and celebrated.

USA Laurel Wilson, IBCLC, RLC, BSc, CLE, CCCE
Abstract:

For more than a decade most lactation professions have been suggesting to families that diet matters very little in terms of breastmilk composition. We have told parents that they can essentially eat whatever they want, it does not matter to the bottom line. However, new studies imply that in fact, diet does matter in terms of the composition of fatty acids and essential nutrients available in milk that can potentially impact life long health. Studies also show that changes in diet can lead to gene methylation which impacts gene expression, as well changing the oligosaccharide profile which shapes the microbiome. This presentation takes you on a tour of some recent research finds to better understand how maternal diet (potentially prenatally through lactation) DOES play a role in breastmilk and how a parent’s diet can potentially influence a breastfeeding baby’s health.

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Presentations: 3  |  Hours / CE Credits: 3  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
Presentations: 1  |  Hours / CE Credits: 1  |  Viewing Time: 2 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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Zimbabwe Linos Muvhu, Counsellor, AdvDip Family Therapy

Linos Muvhu is The Secretary and Chief Talent Team Leader of Society for Pre and Post Natal Services’ (SPANS) Maternal, Paternal and child mental health programme in Zimbabwe. SPANS promotes good mental health across the life course starting in the perinatal period. It is a national evidence based family focused program. Linos trained as a family therapist with Connect (Zimbabwe Institute of Systemic family Therapy). He is Africa Ambassador for Fathers Mental Health Day and passionate about the rights of all people to enjoy good sound mental health, in particular the right for good family mental health and in 2016, he initiated the first ever International Conference on Maternal Mental Health in Africa (ICAMMHA.)

Zimbabwe Linos Muvhu, Counsellor, AdvDip Family Therapy
Abstract:

Poor mental health affects the expectant mothers and father's overall emotional, environmental, social, spiritual and physical well-being, but also impacts unborn, newborn and developing children, partners, family, friends, and society as a whole. Championing early diagnosis and screening of mental health to every expectant mother and father during their routine antenatal and postnatal care visits; Awareness campaigns in communities about maternal, paternal and child health mental health issues to improve the uptake of services; Training community health care workers (early detecting, screening, and treatment of maternal and child mental illness). The Mashonaland east province under Goromonzi district is a pre-urban and a rural setting in Zimbabwe. A neglected area that significantly impacts maternal and child mortality and morbidity are that of maternal, paternal and child mental health is the main area of focus of this presentation.

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Presentations: 13  |  Hours / CE Credits: 12.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 0.5 (details)
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Indonesia Dr. Asti Praborini, MD, Pediatrician, IBCLC

Asti Praborini, MD, Pediatrician, IBCLC has 25 years of experience as a pediatrician, which has convinced her that nothing is more important and valuable than breastfeeding for both mother and baby. As a national speaker, she continues the campaign promoting the benefits of breastfeeding, despite formula marketing that is pervasive in the country. She established the first hospital-based lactation team in Indonesia that works ultimately to help mothers breastfeed their babies, and now leads three lactation teams in different hospitals. She is practicing frenotomy for anterior as well as posterior tongue tie and lip tie, established her own method for hospitalization of nipple confusion, supplementation, adoptive nursing, and many others. She also devoted her time to give pro bono service to the poor in the pediatric clinic of LKC Dompet Dhuafa and received the LKC award in 2011. She is now the chairwoman of the Indonesian International Lactation Consultant Association.

Indonesia Dr. Asti Praborini, MD, Pediatrician, IBCLC
Abstract:

Optimal breastfeeding is at the top of the list of effective preventive interventions for child survival. Unfortunately, bottle feeding with formula, which is inferior to breastmilk, has contributed to lower breastfeeding rates. Initial exposure to bottle feeding can lead to nipple confusion. Hospitalization for nipple confusion is a method to restore healthy breastfeeding. This program has helped many mothers and babies achieve a happy and healthy breastfeeding relationship. Mothers and babies, who come into our Lactation Clinic and complain of breast rejection, are advised to be hospitalized. In hospital they practice skin to skin, and if indicated, frenotomy for tongue tie or lip tie will be done after parents consent. Counselors visit mother and baby to help them have a good latch. Supplementation is done via lactation aid, and galactogogues, and acupuncture help mothers to restore their milk supply. Both mother and baby are discharged from the hospital after the baby has established a good latch. In our clinics, there were 58 cases of nipple confusion between January – December 2012, 53 cases (91.4%) led to successful breastfeeding.

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Presentations: 27  |  Hours / CE Credits: 25  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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USA Judy Terwilliger, RN, CMT, FBT


Judy Terwilliger is a Clinical RN Therapist with Pediatric experience for over 30 years. As lead therapist, researcher and educator in her proprietary form of functional mobility therapy (Functional Bowen™), she works with allied health care providers in the resolve of hidden structural barrier challenges for infants and children. Her collaborative, integrative team care approach sees many successes. She is committed to equipping families with the tools necessary in support of breastfeeding and enabling parents to participate in the resolve of their children’s structural challenges. She is a member of the National Society of Pediatric Nurses and was a nominee in the 2013 Clinical Excellence in Practice Award. She has been a speaker at the Northern California Placer County Breastfeeding Coalition, Imperial Valley Breastfeeding Summit and presented at the 2016 California Breastfeeding Coalition. Her professional memberships include: ABM Network, International Pediatric Integrative Medicine Network, IATP, and Breastfeeding USA. Judy is a licensed continuing education provider for the National Certification Board for Therapeutic Massage & Bodywork, California Board of Registered Nurses, The California Physical Therapy Association, and the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners.

USA Judy Terwilliger, RN, CMT, FBT
Abstract:

This lecture/course is intended to familiarize the medical and allied health community in the recognition of the often-overlooked muscle-related structural barriers to breastfeeding. It provides a discussion of clues to the predisposing factors of these barriers and explores their affect on infant "functional mobility" as it relates to the achievement of successful breastfeeding. It is intended to improve the clinician’s assessment skills as they work with the mother/infant dyad in resolving breastfeeding difficulties/dysfunctions by development of insight into these often hidden and profoundly destructive structural manifestations. Recognition of these barriers with an emphasis on self-help techniques and when/who to refer parents/caregivers to for help, together with how to best meet their teaching/training needs across cultural barriers, is discussed. The ultimate purpose is the achievement of insight to improve the clinician’s evaluation process, better enabling them to promote, enhance and even save the breastfeeding experience of the families served.

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Presentations: 28  |  Hours / CE Credits: 25.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Presentations: 1  |  Hours / CE Credits: 1  |  Viewing Time: 2 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 0.5 (details)
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United Kingdom Prof. Amy Brown, PhD; MSc; BSc

Professor Amy Brown is based in the Department of Public Health, Policy and Social Sciences at Swansea University in the UK where she directs the new research centre ‘LIFT’ : Lactation, Infant Feeding and Translation. With a background in psychology, she first became interested in the increasingly global issue of low breastfeeding rates when breastfeeding her first baby. Three babies and a PhD later she has spent the last fifteen years exploring psychological, cultural and societal barriers to breastfeeding, with an emphasis on understanding how we can shift our perception of breastfeeding from an individual mothering issue, to a wider public health problem. Professor Brown has published over 100 papers exploring the barriers women face in feeding their baby during the first year. She is author of ‘Breastfeeding Uncovered’, ‘Why starting solids matters’, ‘The positive breastfeeding book’, ‘Informed is best’, ‘Why breastfeeding grief and trauma matter’, ‘A guide to support breastfeeding for the medical profession’ and the soon to be published ‘Let’s talk about the first year of parenting’.

United Kingdom Prof. Amy Brown, PhD; MSc; BSc
Abstract:

Promoting breastfeeding as protective of both maternal and infant health is a central role or governments, health professionals and breastfeeding advocates. Talking about breastfeeding difficulties and why ingrained barriers must be tackled is essential to ensuring the situation changes for future mothers. However, sometimes it feels as if we are caught in a vicious circle; we must talk about breastfeeding as our rates are low and many women wish they had breastfed for longer, yet discussing these issues is often criticized as causing pain. This talk will present findings from a large research study which explored the experiences of over 2000 women who could not breastfeed for as long as they wanted, presenting their lasting emotions from their experience alongside their ideas for how we could promote breastfeeding in ways that cause them the least pain. The concept of negative breastfeeding emotions displaying as psychological grief or trauma for a subgroup of women will be discussed, alongside the factors that they felt made their experience or feelings worse.

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Presentations: 8  |  Hours / CE Credits: 5.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Presentations: 8  |  Hours / CE Credits: 5.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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Duncan Fisher promotes and develops support for parents to advance child health and development. In the last year he has been working with breastfeeding researchers across the world and with the World Alliance for Breastfeeding Action to advance the idea of "breastfeeding as teamwork", following striking findings from research of the high gains from engaging with fathers and other family members. In UK he co-founded the Fatherhood Institute and for three years he served on the Board of the Government’s gender equality body, the Equal Opportunities Commission. He manages the website, FamilyIncluded.com, where all recent research on breastfeeding and fathers/families is reported. He initiated and currently manages a website for Cambridge and Princeton Universities reporting research on child welfare and development, ChildandFamilyBlog.com. He was awarded an OBE by the Queen in 2008 for his “services to children”. Duncan lives in Wales and divides his time between family work and work to support sustainable economic development in his home country.

Abstract:

Breastfeeding programmes that engage fathers are more effective than ones that only involve mothers and professionals. This accords with research that has shown that family is the main influence on breastfeeding. The way that families influence breastfeeding is diverse, depending on the make-up of the family, local culture and location (e.g. urban/rural). The influence of fathers is not necessarily intentional, but what fathers think and do influences the situation in almost every situation. In this presentation I will describe the principles of success that have been learned from programmes with published evaluations. These principles can be summed up in the phrase recently adopted by the World Alliance for Breastfeeding Action, "breastfeeding is teamwork".

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Presentations: 33  |  Hours / CE Credits: 32.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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Australia Jeni Stevens, RN (Hon Class 1), RM, IBCLC

Jeni Stevens is a PhD candidate from the University of Western Sydney. Jeni is a mum of four boys, a Registered Nurse and Midwife who has worked in Sydney Hospitals since 2007. Two years ago she became a lactation consultant, and has a passion in educating people about breastfeeding. She has previously completed research which focused on midwives and doulas perspectives of the role of a doula.

Australia Jeni Stevens, RN (Hon Class 1), RM, IBCLC
Abstract:

Background:
Skin to Skin Contact (SSC)
The WHO and UNICEF recommend that the mother and newborn should have skin-to-skin contact (SSC) immediately after birth, including after a caesarean section if the woman is alert and responsive (Baby Friendly Health Initiative, 2012, World Health Organization and UNICEF, 2009). Skin-to-skin contact can be defined as placing a naked infant onto the bare chest of the mother (or father) (Crenshaw et al., 2012,Finigan and Davies, 2004, Velandia et al., 2010, Velandia et al., 2012, Hung and Berg, 2011, Nolan and Lawrence, 2009, Gouchon et al., 2010).
Aim:
To provide insight into how to implement SSC in theatre.
Results:
Immediate SSC can be provided safely in the operating theatre with the collaboration and education of staff, mothers and partners. Consent needs to be confirmed and the mother needs to be prepared before her CS. Once the baby is born and determined to be responding normally and if the mother is alert and responsive, the baby is moved immediately to the mothers’ chest and dried. The midwife then makes sure the baby is secure and monitors them. A literature review also provided some evidence, however limited, demonstrating an increase in maternal and newborn emotional wellbeing, an increase in parent/newborn communication, reduction in maternal pain/anxiety, physiological stability for the mother and newborn and improved breastfeeding outcomes (Crenshaw et al., 2012, Finigan and Davies, 2004, Velandia et al., 2010, Velandia et al., 2012, Hung and Berg, 2011, Nolan and Lawrence, 2009, Gouchon et al., 2010, Stevens et al., 2014).
Conclusion:
If maternity services are not able to provide immediate SSC following a caesarean section, many women and their newborns may miss out on the potential benefits conferred by SSC (Li et al., 2012).

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Presentations: 27  |  Hours / CE Credits: 25  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Webinar

How to start a private lactation practice

By Kathy Parkes, MSN-Ed, BSPsy, RN, IBCLC, RLC, FILCA
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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us Kathy Parkes, MSN-Ed, BSPsy, RN, IBCLC, RLC, FILCA

Kathy Parkes is a registered nurse, IBCLC, and Fellow of the International Lactation Consultant Association (FILCA) with over 30 years of experience in lactation management and education. She has been actively involved with breastfeeding coalitions at the local, state, and international levels. Now a published author, her first book, “Perspectives in Lactation: Is Private Practice for Me?”, sold out the first printing in only 48 hours. Kathy has worked in multiple lactation settings, including the hospital, private practice, education, home health care, and in the US-based Women, Infant, and Children (WIC) program. As a Certified Compassion Fatigue Educator, Kathy heads the Perinatal Loss Program at her hospital, and leads a Griefshare program in the community. Happily married for 39 years, she has 2 daughters, and 3 grandchildren, all breastfed.

us Kathy Parkes, MSN-Ed, BSPsy, RN, IBCLC, RLC, FILCA
Abstract:

Are you an aspiring private practice lactation consultant? This session will cover all the important components of opening your own private practice, from location, US-based tax issues, social media, advertising, marketing, credentialing to how to provide good self-care. Based on the speaker’s new book, Perspectives in Lactation: Is Private Practice for Me?

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Presentations: 6  |  Hours / CE Credits: 6  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
Webinar

Human Milk Bank's in Poland

By Anna Kotlinska, PhD Candidate, Masters of Midwifery
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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Poland Anna Kotlinska, PhD Candidate, Masters of Midwifery

Anna has been working as a midwife since 2009. From the very beginning of her studies she has been fascinated with breastfeeding. During her studies for her Bachelor's and Master's degrees in Midwifery, her main area of interest was promotion and support for breastfeeding among women. Anna's interest in breastfeeding turned into a passion that led her to pursue the Polish Certification of Lactation Consultant and she is working toward certification as an IBCLC. She opened a private practice and a support group for local women in Krakow (cracko). Anna’s Interest and passion for lactation and breastfeeding have deepened during her current PhD studies. She is a PhD candidate in 2018 at University Medical College and is the coordinator of the Krakow Human Milk Bank.
Her scientific area of expertise: change in milk composition (macronutrients), human microbiota during pregnancy, lactation as well as tandem breastfeeding. Her research is carried out in the Department of Obstetrics and Perinatology. Anna is the author of many lectures and workshops for students of midwifery and medicine in area of breastfeeding, lactation and the variation of composition of human milk. Since 2016 she has been popularizing the science of human lactation in Poland and she is always finding new ways to promote and support breastfeeding women. In her spare time she practices meditation, yin yoga and is learning how to dance rock and roll.

Poland Anna Kotlinska, PhD Candidate, Masters of Midwifery
Abstract:

Although Human Milk Banks are already more than 100 years in the world in Poland they are pretty new and young institution. History of breast milk sharing is well known, in times of war in Polish women sell milk on food market. Today we have a professional Human Milk Banks with international standards and very engaged in scientific work. Human Milk Banks working as non-profit institution, but from this year 2017 our government will pay and support all hospitals in Poland which feed premature babies and full time newborns - human milk (biological mother or from Human Milk Bank). This presentation will show the history of our banks, inception steps, functioning, obtaining Donors Mothers, cooperation with non-governmental organizations and the national health service in Poland.

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Presentations: 6  |  Hours / CE Credits: 6  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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Tom Johnston is unique as a midwife and lactation consultant and the father of eight breastfed children. Recently retired after 27 years in the US Army, he is now an Assistant Professor of Nursing at Methodist University where he teaches, among other things, Maternal-Child Nursing and Nutrition. You may have heard him at a number of conferences at the national level, to include the Association of Woman’s Health and Neonatal Nurses (AWHONN), the International Lactation Consultant’s Association (ILCA), or perhaps at dozens of other conferences across the country. In his written work he routinely addresses fatherhood and the role of the father in the breastfeeding relationship and has authored a chapter on the role of the father in breastfeeding for “Breastfeeding in Combat Boots: A survival guide to breastfeeding in the military”.

Abstract:

"I didn't make enough milk!" We hear it on a regular basis from heartbroken new mothers. In fact, this is the number one factor contributing to breastfeeding failure after two weeks of age is a perception of inadequate milk production. This phenomenon of sudden onset lactation failure is widely accepted as a common occurrence among breastfeeding mothers. This topic has been the subject of a number of quality studies that have yielded a conflicting mix of responses from primary health care providers and lactation consultants alike. This discussion will attempt to shed light on the very different concepts of "Milk Production" vs. "Milk Synthesis" and will demonstrate how confusion between those two concepts have clouded the study of milk production, promote the fallacy of "insufficient milk production syndrome", and contribute to the failure of breastfeeding. This presentation will also attempt to provide a preliminary course of action to begin anew in milk production research and perhaps even provide a framework for helping the new mothers facing the milk supply challenge.

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Presentations: 6  |  Hours / CE Credits: 6  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
This presentation is currently available through a bundled series of lectures.