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Breastfeeding and Lactation

A wide range of presentations providing the latest evidence based information about human lactation, breastfeeding management, and breastfeeding advocacy and promotion.

Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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USA Jane A. Morton, MD; Adjunct Clinical Professor of Pediatrics

Dr. Jane Morton has had a long, fulfilling career as a general pediatrician, She has also had a long-standing interest in breastfeeding, from understanding its clinical benefits to practical solutions for mothers having difficulty in providing breastmilk to their infants.  Over the years, she has conducted research on human milk and breastfeeding and has designed and implemented systems and policies to help breastfeeding mothers.  She produced award winning videos on this topic, including “Breastfeeding: A Guide to Getting Started”, “A Preemie Needs His Mother: Breastfeeding a Premature Baby” and “Making Enough Milk, the Key to Successful Breastfeeding”.  These have been translated and widely used in thousands of hospitals to train both staff and new mothers. As an executive board member of both the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine and the American Academy of Pediatrics Section on Breastfeeding, she enjoyed working to enlarge the footprint of breastfeeding, both nationally and internationally.

For a 5 year period, she joined the neonatology clinical faculty at Stanford to develop the Breastfeeding Medicine Program.  In that position, she had the opportunity to design a nationally recognized educational program, conduct and publish original research on milk production and composition in mothers of very low birth weight infants, and publish a study with the AAP on the efficacy of a breastfeeding curriculum for physician residents in training. She was an advisor to the California Perinatal Quality Care Collaborative, and was a key author of the toolkit “Nutritional Support for the Very Low Birth Weight Infant”. She co-authored the book Best Medicine: Human Milk in the NICU.  She has published extensively and presented her original research and educational workshops internationally. She continues to teach at Stanford where she is an Adjunct Clinical Professor of Pediatrics, Emerita.

USA Jane A. Morton, MD; Adjunct Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Abstract:

The risk of early termination of breastfeeding typically relate to complications with a) attachment, b) breastmilk production, or c) the caloric intake of the infant. Simply put, A, B and C. Could hand expression taught in Labor and Delivery to every mother reduce early termination and the health, financial and emotional morbidity associated with breastfeeding complications in both low and high risk infants? This presentation will examine this question, focusing on the purpose of teaching early hand expression, the available science and the practice of integrating this technique into first hour care.

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Presentations: 3  |  Hours / CE Credits: 3  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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United States Paulina Erices, MS, IBCLC, IMH-E (r)

Paulina Erices is a bilingual (Spanish) International Board Certified Lactation Consultant (IBCLC) in private practice and a Maternal Child Health Specialist for Jefferson County Public Health in Colorado. She holds a BS in Psychology from the Pennsylvania State University and a MS in Organizational Leadership from the University of Denver. Paulina is the coordinator for Adelante, the Latino Network for Health and Education and participates in several workgroups focused on child and family health, including the Early Childhood Colorado Partnership, the NICU Consortium, and the Community Leaders in Health Equity. Her areas of current work include providing direct service to families with babies who have been in the NICU and/or have other medical conditions; promoting maternal and infant mental health along the continuum of care; building community capacity to navigate health and education systems as well as influence program development/delivery; and establishing community-based participatory lactation programs to meet the needs of diverse communities. Paulina 's goal is to elevate the voices and influence of community members to effectively improve systems of care.

United States Paulina Erices, MS, IBCLC, IMH-E (r)
Abstract:

Lactation consultants would benefit from expanding their understanding of the impact of the NICU stay on the family; moreover, they would benefit from identifying the essential role they could play in assisting families to accomplish a positive, healthy, and smooth transition home.
Despite continuing efforts to reduce prematurely worldwide, a significant number of infants are born too early or in a fragile medical condition. Many of these infants experience a lengthy stay at the NICU. Lactation support varies across facilities, but families, especially mothers, develop strong connections with their lactation consultant. As one of their most consistent providers in the NICU, the lactation consultant has the opportunity to recognize families’ need for continuing support after discharge and strategies to protect the breastfeeding relationship, attachment, and mental health in the long term.

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Presentations: 28  |  Hours / CE Credits: 25.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Presentations: 1  |  Hours / CE Credits: 1  |  Viewing Time: 2 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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USA Joy MacTavish, MA, IBCLC, RLC, ICCE

Joy MacTavish, MA, IBCLC, RLC, ICCE is an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant, Registered Lactation Consultant. She is the owner of Sound Beginnings, which provides in-home consultations and education on lactation, babywearing, and more. Her background as a birth and postpartum doula, and childbirth, newborn, and parenting educator, inform her compassionate and evidence-based support of new families in the greater Seattle area. Joy holds a Master of Arts in Cultural Studies, graduate certificate in Gender, Women and Sexuality Studies, and two Bachelors degrees from the University of Washington. She serves as adjunct faculty at the Simkin Center for Allied Birth Vocations at Bastyr University where she created the Breastfeeding for Doulas course. Joy is passionate about her family, social justice, and continuing education.

USA Joy MacTavish, MA, IBCLC, RLC, ICCE
Abstract:

"Full-term," "natural term," or "extended" are just a few of the phrased that are often used when describing breastfeeding/chestfeeding relationships that last longer than the cultural norm for a given community or geographic region. We know that breastfeeding/chestfeeding past infancy is full of benefits for both the parent and the child. Yet many families who plan for (or unintentionally find themselves in) a breastfeeding/chestfeeding relationship into toddlerhood or beyond face critiques, emotions, logistics, and a need for support that is unique to this experience. This presentation will cover considerations of full-term nursing including an overview of developmental stages for a breastfeeding/chestfeeding child, changes in milk composition, and psychobiological benefits to both the child and parent. We will also explore ways that lactation supporters and professionals may offer support, encouragement, and guidance to these families. Whether you have been supporting full-term nursing for years, or this is an area that you'd like to learn more about, you're sure to leave this presentation with insights and strategies that you can use to support full-term nursing families.

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Presentations: 1  |  Hours / CE Credits: 1  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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USA Nicola Singletary, PhD, MAT, IBCLC

After studying biology at Meredith College in North Carolina, Nicola Singletary, PhD, MAT, IBCLC spent the early part of her career sharing her love of science with middle school students. It was not until after the birth of her first child in 2007 and the challenges she faced breastfeeding that she became interested in pursuing a career in breastfeeding support. She enrolled at North Carolina State University to study human nutrition and completed the Mary Rose Tully Training Initiative through the Carolina Global Breastfeeding Institute at UNC Chapel Hill in 2012. In the fall of 2013, she opened Harmony Lactation, LLC with the goal of helping mothers meet their breastfeeding goals. She recently completed her PhD in Nutrition and is a postdoctoral researcher at NCSU; her research focuses on breastfeeding education. She is also co-owner of Next Level Lactation, an educational and consulting company for lactation professionals.

USA Nicola Singletary, PhD, MAT, IBCLC
Abstract:

Some breastfeeding parents find that their stored milk tastes sour or rancid, and sometimes this milk is refused by their baby. These flavors and odors are often described as metallic, fishy, rancid, sweaty or soapy. But what exactly causes these ‘off’ flavors and what can be done about milk that is refused? Is the solution always to scald milk? Milk with high lipase action leads to milk with increased levels of free fatty acids during storage that can produce rancid and sweaty flavors. Enzymes such as lipase can be inactivated by heating prior to milk storage. Milk with high levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids is susceptible to fat oxidation during storage leading to fishy and metallic flavors. Storage recommendations to reduce oxidation of fatty acids in milk include using short storage times, thawing at cold temperatures, and avoiding light exposure during storage. Case studies of both oxidized milk and high lipase action will be presented along with possible solutions.

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Presentations: 29  |  Hours / CE Credits: 27.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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UK Wendy Jones, PhD, MRPharmS

In her employed life Wendy was a community pharmacist and also worked in doctor surgeries supporting cost effective, evidence-based prescribing.
Wendy left paid work to concentrate on writing Breastfeeding and Medication (Routledge 2nd edition 2018), developing information and training material on drugs in breastmilk as well as setting up her own website www.breastfeeding-and-medication. She has also published Breastfeeding for Dads and Grandmas (Praeclarus Press) and Why Mothers Medication Matters (Pinter and Martin). She is also co editor of a book to be published January 2020 called A guide to breastfeeding for medical professionals (Routledge).

Wendy is known for her work on providing a service on the compatibility of drugs in breastmilk and has been a breastfeeding peer supporter for 30 years. She is passionate that breastfeeding should be valued by all and that medication should not be a barrier. She has 3 daughters and 5 grandchildren. All her family seem as passionate about breastfeeding as she is and currently all 3 of her daughters are breastfeeding.
She was awarded a Points of Light award by the Prime Minister in 2018 and nominated for an MBE in the New Year's Honours List 2018 for services to mothers and babies. She received her award at Windsor Castle in May 2019 from Her Majesty the Queen.

UK Wendy Jones, PhD, MRPharmS
Abstract:

We know that the most common reason mums stop breastfeeding before they would otherwise choose is because they believe they don’t have enough breastmilk. In many cultures there a herbal remedies to increase milk supply. We have medicinal options available as well. What is the research behind the “magic wands”? Can any products cause harm rather than benefit? When should they be used and when is skilled breastfeeding support more important? Why is some populations is poor milk supply never a concern? Who is responsible for the perceived need to increase milk supply?

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Presentations: 6  |  Hours / CE Credits: 6  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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United Kingdom Clare Meynell, RM (rtd), IBCLC

Clare is an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant and Retired Midwife living in West Sussex and has been supporting mothers since 1996. She is mother to two daughters and a son and grandmother to 4 girls and 2 boys. Her background in midwifery and infant feeding lead her to instigate and facilitate the Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative in her local hospital which held the gold award for 10 years. Clare attended the first World Breastfeeding Conference in India in 2012 and the first European WBTi training in Geneva in May 2015. She is a La Leche League administrator and has facilitated many peer support trainings. Clare held various roles on the committee of the Lactation Consultants of Great Britain (LCGB), including the chair and is currently Joint Coordinator of the UK Working Group for the World Breastfeeding Trends Initiative (WBTi) . Clare also volunteers at a local twins group and also runs her own private practice Honeysuckle Cafe.

Helen Gray MPhil IBCLC is a board certified lactation consultant in London, UK. She provides workshops for lactation professionals and has a private practice as an IBCLC, as well as leading a local La Leche League mother support group. Her background in anthropology and human evolution has given her a particular interest in breastfeeding, and the way we mother our babies, also how they are influenced by both human biology and culture. She is joint Coordinator of the UK Working Group of the World Breastfeeding Trends Initiative (WBTi), and serves on the national committee of Lactation Consultants of Great Britain (LCGB). She is also part of the LCGB Social Media team, and represents La Leche League GB on the Baby Feeding Law Group, which works to implement the WHO Code into UK and European law. She is actively involved with her local maternity services to improve mothers’ experiences.

United Kingdom Clare Meynell, RM (rtd), IBCLC
Abstract:

Research has shown that breastfeeding rates improve when a country implements a full range of strategies from the WHO Global Strategy for Infant and Young Child Feeding. The World Breastfeeding Trends Initiative WBTi builds a coalition of organizations working in infant feeding to assess the implementation of key policies from the Global Strategy and generate recommendations for action. The WBTi focuses on key indicators across the life course of breastfeeding. For breastfeeding to be successful, mothers and families need a network of support along the whole course of breastfeeding, starting with giving birth in a Baby Friendly Hospital, then going home to find skilled local support from midwives, physicians, community health care, and mother support groups throughout their communities. Breastfeeding women need maternity protection and breastfeeding/expressing breaks when they return to work. Accurate information about breastfeeding, without marketing pressure from manufacturers, is needed throughout society and from health professionals.

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Presentations: 26  |  Hours / CE Credits: 24.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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U.S.A. Lisa Marasco, MA, IBCLC, FILCA


Lisa Marasco has been working with breastfeeding mothers for over 25 years and has been Internationally Board Certified since 1993. She holds a Master's degree in Human Development with specialization in Lactation and was designated a Fellow of ILCA in 2009. Lisa is co-author of The Breastfeeding Mother's Guide to Making More Milk, a contributing author to the Core Curriculum for Lactation Consultants, and a new Cochrane Collaborative author. She is employed by WIC of Santa Barbara County while she continues to research, write, speak, and maintain a small private practice. In addition, Lisa is an Associate Area Professional Liaison for La Leche League of So. Calif/Nevada, and serves on the Breastfeeding Coalition of Santa Barbara County.

 

U.S.A. Lisa Marasco, MA, IBCLC, FILCA
Abstract:

Prolactin is considered to be a key hormone for lactation, yet our knowledge has been surprisingly sparse. It is necessary for pubertal and pregnancy mammary development as well as milk synthesis. While prolactin level does not correlate directly to milk production, lactation fails without it. This talk will take a closer look at current research and what we do and do not yet understand about prolactin. We will then examine specific cases and discuss the process of elimination as well as possible strategies for affected mothers.

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Presentations: 28  |  Hours / CE Credits: 22.25  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
This presentation is currently available through a bundled series of lectures.