The Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine Lecture Package

The Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine 21st Annual International Conference took place from October 13-16, 2016 in Washington, DC. We're thrilled to offer the recordings from this conference here in our GOLD Learning Library. With 22 individual presentations providing a total of 13.5 CE hours, this package gives access to world class speakers at minimal cost. Topics covered include evidence on the benefits of breastfeeding, ethics, policy being influenced by research, the impact contraceptives on lactation, skin-to-skin care, milksharing, extended breastfeeding in mothers of colour, and more. This package comes with 8 weeks of viewing time, giving plenty of time to watch recordings. Speaker handouts are available for download for each of the presentations.

$195.00 USD
Total CE Hours: 13.50   Access Time: 8 Weeks  
Lectures in this bundle (22):
Durations: 45 mins
Using Breastmilk to Study Breast Cancer Risk

Kathleen Arcaro, Ph.D. is a professor of Environmental Toxicology at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. She received a BS from Douglass College, a PhD from Rutgers University and conducted postdoctoral research at both the State University of New York at Albany and the Wadsworth Laboratories of the New York State Department of Health. For the last decade Dr. Arcaro has been studying breastmilk as a means of understanding how environmental exposures and lifestyle choices can affect the development of breast cancer. Her current breastmilk research program is focused on using DNA methylation in breastmilk to accurately assess breast cancer risk and as a tool for early detection. Dr. Arcaro’s research on the epigenetics of cells in breast milk has been funded by the Congressionally Directed Medical Research Program, the Avon Foundation for Women, and the National Institutes of Health. http://www.vasci.umass.edu/research-faculty/kathleen-f-arcaro http://www.breastmilkresearch.org/

Objective 1: Hereditary versus Sporadic Breast Cancers
Objective 2: DNA methylation in cells from breastmilk
Objective 3: How can we obtain breast milk from women who are likely to develop breast cancer?

Abstract:

Following this session, participants will be able to describe the relationship between breast cancer and breastfeeding, critique literature in the field, and assess how changing demographics and culture may impact breast cancer rates.

View Full Presentation Information
Durations: 45 mins
Continuing Evidence on the Benefits of Breastfeeding and Implementation Challenges

Dr Zulfiqar A. Bhutta is the Robert Harding Inaugural Chair in Global Child Health at the Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, co-Director of the SickKids center for Global Child Health and the Founding Director of the Center of Excellence in Women and Child Health, at the Aga Khan University, unique joint appointments. He also holds adjunct professorships at several leading Universities globally including the Schools of Public Health at Johns Hopkins (Baltimore), Tufts University (Boston), University of Alberta as well as the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine. He is a designated Distinguished National Professor of the Government of Pakistan and was the Founding Chair of the National Research Ethics Committee of the Government of Pakistan from 2003-2014. Dr Bhutta was a member of the Independent Expert Review Group (iERG) appointed by the UN Secretary General for monitoring global progress in maternal and child health MDGs (2011-2015). He represented the global academic and research organizations on the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunizations (Gavi) Board, was the co-Chair of the Global Countdown for 2015 Steering Group from 2006-2016 and is the co-Chair of the Maternal and Child Health oversight committee of World Health Organization (WHO) Eastern Mediterranean Region (EMRO). Dr Bhutta is the Chairman of the Coalition of Centers in Global Child Health with its secretariat based at the Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto. Dr. Bhutta is on several international editorial advisory boards including the Lancet, BMJ, PLoS Medicine, PLoS ONE, BMC Public Health and the Cochrane ARI group. He has published eight books, 77 book chapters, and over 650 indexed publications to date. He has won several awards, including the Tamgha-i-Imtiaz (Medal of Excellence) by the President of Pakistan for contributions towards education and research (2000), the inaugural Programme for Global Pediatric Research Award for Outstanding Contributions to Global Child Health (2009) and the WHO Ihsan Dogramaci Family Health award (2014).

Objective 1: MDGs and progress - Risk factors and epidemiology
Objective 2: Benefits of breastfeeding Evidence based strategies – what works?
Objective 3: Breastfeeding with SDGs Further emphasis on initiation of early breastfeeding

Abstract:

  • MDGs and progress
  • Risk factors & Epidemiology
  • Benefits of breastfeeding
  • Evidence–based strategies; what works?
  • Breastfeeding within SDGs

View Full Presentation Information
Durations: 45 mins
Donor Human Milk in VLBW Infants: Experience, Research, Future Directions

Tarah Colaizy is a native Midwesterner, and attended undergraduate college and medical school at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. In an effort to see what else was out there, she completed her pediatric residency and her neonatology fellowship at Oregon Health & Sciences University in Portland, OR. During her time in Portland, Dr. Colaizy also earned an MPH degree in epidemiology, and became interested in breastfeeding and human milk as a research focus. Dr. Colaizy returned to the Midwest in 2004, as a faculty member of the University of Iowa. She has spent the past 11 years building a research career around breastfeeding and human milk nutrition issues in the very low birthweight population, with special focus in donor human milk. She is the Alternate Principal Investigator for the University of Iowa Center of the NICHD Neonatal Research Network, and is the PI of the MILK trial, a large multicenter randomized trial of the use of donor milk in ELBW infants. She loves playing games and reading with her two children and competes recreationally in the sport of Olympic Weightlifting.

Objective 1: Overview of trends in use in US NICUs
Objective 2: Research review – what do we know about human milk banking?
Objective 3: Case control study – overview of research and findings for future work

Abstract:

  • Overview of trends in use in US NICUs
  • Donor milk nutritional composition
  • Donor milk and growth
  • Donor milk and developmental outcomes
  • Donor milk cytokines, chemokines, growth factors
  • Exclusive human milk and growth
View Full Presentation Information
Durations: 45 mins
Ethics and breastfeeding: Is not doing good a bad thing

Dr. Jeffrey L. Ecker is a high-risk obstetrician and Chief of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Massachusetts General Hospital and a Professor at Harvard Medical School. A graduate of Princeton and Harvard Medical School, he completed his ob/gyn residency at Boston’s Brigham and Women’s Hospital and fellowships in maternal-fetal medicine and obstetrical ultrasound at the University of California in San Francisco. Dr. Ecker has filled many leadership roles in the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists; including his current service as Chair of the Committee on Obstetric Practice. Dr. Ecker is a Founding Member of the Massachusetts Perinatal Quality Collaborative and serves on the Perinatal Advisory Committee for Leapfrog, a national quality measurement organization.

Objective 1: Ethics and lactation: What dilemmas? Where are the questions?
Objective 2: What is an ethical provider to do or not do in encouraging and supporting breastfeeding?
Objective 3: What is mother to do? – Case study examples

Abstract:

  • Ethics and lactation: What dilemmas? Where are the questions?
  • Principles of justice
  • Ethical frameworks and principles: a primer
  • What is an ethical provider to do or not do in encouraging and supporting breastfeeding?
  • What is most appropriate counseling?
  • What is mother to do? – Case study examples
  • What sacrifices are expected to optimize breast feeding?
  • Are those who don’t breastfeed bad? question is if we are acting in ways that we think best why do some perceive otherwise

View Full Presentation Information
Durations: 60 mins
Ruth Lawrence, MD, FABM
Breastfeeding Research Hit Parade - 2016
USA Ruth Lawrence, MD, FABM

Dr. Lawrence is a magna cum laude graduate of Antioch College with a B.S. in biology. She graduated from the University of Rochester School of Medicine and was elected to Alpha Omega Alpha. She did her Pediatric Residency at Yale University at Yale-New Haven Hospital. She trained with Dr. Edith Jackson in the original Rooming-In Unit, made house calls on newborns, and learned about breastfeeding. In 1958 she assumed the medical directorship of the Finger Lakes Regional Poison Center, the second oldest center in the United States and the first to take calls from the public. It was closed by then Governor Patterson in 2010. She continues to head the Breastfeeding and Human Lactation Study Center and the Pediatric Environmental Safety Center. Dr. Lawrence has been on the faculty of the Department of Pediatrics and Obstetrics/Gynecology as a neonatologist and clinical toxicologist since returning to the University of Rochester. She is currently a Distinguished Alumna Professor and is the first holder of the Northumberland Trust Endowed Chair in Pediatrics. She is the author of “Breastfeeding: A Guide for the Medical Profession” now in its eighth edition. She is a founder of the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine, past president and board member. She was on the original AAP committee that resulted in the section on breastfeeding and has been its chair. She is a founding member of the group that became the United States Breastfeeding Committee (USBC) and served on the board and as Secretary-Treasurer. She has received many national and international awards for her work in clinical toxicology, breastfeeding and human lactation. St. Bernard’s Institute of Theology awarded Dr. Lawrence an honorary doctorate in theology, D.D. in 2009.

Objective 1: Examine public opinions about the benefits of breastfeeding, infant health risks associated with formula feeding.
Objective 2: 10 most significant findings In relation to optimal breastfeeding practices and infant and child mortality, child development and global health. Cost and life saving information.
Objective 3: • Information sharing and need for more breastfeeding education.

USA Ruth Lawrence, MD, FABM
Abstract:

Breastfeeding Research Hit Parade for 2016 Research is the backbone of progress in breastfeeding and understanding of human lactation.Keeping up to date on the Latest research and observations in the field is essential. This presentation will report on the ten best articles in the world wide literature.The content of the articles will be described briefly described and why the article was selected the articles are presented in reverse order of importance

View Full Presentation Information
Durations: 15 mins
Amy G. Bryant, MD, MSCR
Lactational Effects of Contraceptive Hormones: an Evaluation (LECHE)
USA Amy G. Bryant, MD, MSCR

Amy G. Bryant, MD, MSCR, is Assistant Professor in the Division of Family Planning in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at UNC-Chapel Hill, and Assistant Director of the Fellowship in Family Planning. She completed the Fellowship in Family Planning at UNC-Chapel Hill, and a Master’s of Science in Clinical Research at the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health in 2011. She works as a generalist OB/GYN with a specialty in Family Planning. Her research interests include the provision of long-acting, reversible contraception in the postpartum period, and equitable access to evidence-based abortion information and care. After experiencing a stark decrease in her breastmilk supply in her second pregnancy, she developed an interest in the effects of family planning on breastfeeding. She became part of a working group at UNC evaluating the impacts of hormonal contraception on breastmilk. She also evaluates the ethical and practical intersections of family planning and lactation counseling.

Objective 1: Importance of birth spacing
Objective 2: Medical eligibility criteria for contraceptive use in postpartum period
Objective 3: Overview of evidence evaluating contraceptive use for postpartum women

USA Amy G. Bryant, MD, MSCR
Abstract:

In published studies, hormonal contraception (HC) has not been found to affect breastfeeding outcomes. However, early introduction of exogenous progestins may inhibit or prevent adequate breastfeeding in some women. We sought to estimate the proportion of women who perceive breastmilk production to be affected by hormonal contraception by conducting an anonymous, Internet-based survey of adult postpartum women regarding their experiences with postpartum events, including initiating contraception, resuming intercourse, and breastfeeding. The survey was introduced via social media, listservs, and websites. From January to May 2016, 2920 women completed the survey and met inclusion criteria. Milk supply concerns occurred in 1044 (37.6%) of participants in the first 12 weeks postpartum and were more common among HC users than non-users (42.5 vs 35.5%, p<0.01. Understanding the complex relationship between hormonal contraception, breastfeeding, and other events in the postpartum period is essential to providing care for lactating women.

View Full Presentation Information
Durations: 15 mins
Reducing Intensive Care Admissions for Asymptomatic Hypoglycemia

Sherry LeBlanc has been a Neonatal Nurse Practitioner in the Newborn Critical Care Center at UNC Children’s Hospital, a 58 bed, level IV unit, since 2008. She earned her Bachelors of Science in Nursing at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, and Neonatal Nurse Practitioner, Masters of Science in Nursing at Duke University. Sherry is the Morbidity Coordinator for the Newborn Critical Care Center, and her interest in hypoglycemia grew from an M&M topic. She created and is currently the Chair of the Hypoglycemia Taskforce, an interdisciplinary team that provides guidelines for newborns at risk for hypoglycemia at UNC Hospitals. Sherry also developed and serves as Co-Chair of the Prenatal Diabetes Education Committee, which strives to educate mothers with diabetes, and empowers them to help their newborn. Currently, she is the PI of Eliminating Asymptomatic Hypoglycemia NCCC Admissions and in planning phase for a multicenter RCT regarding hypoglycemia.

Objective 1: Frequent formula and bottle use in NICU
Objective 2: Lack of prophylactic measures to prevent hypoglycemia
Objective 3: Improvement in process measures of skin-to-skin and early feeding

Abstract:

Neonatal hypoglycemia often requires intensive care, resulting in mother infant separation, decreased breastfeeding and associated consequences. Frequent hypoglycemia admissions to the Newborn Critical Care Center at the University of North Carolina Children's Hospital often did not require IV dextrose, and therefore unnecessarily separated the mother/infant dyad.

A hypoglycemia bundle that placed greater emphasis on early feeding and universal skin to skin care for infants at risk for hypoglycemia was implemented as these measures may prevent hypoglycemia. The bundle also included protocol revision. The aim was to decrease intensive care admission for asymptomatic hypoglycemia.

NICU admissions for asymptomatic hypoglycemia decreased by 10%, process measures of skin to skin care and early breastfeeding improved. Infants admitted to intensive care that did not receive IV dextrose decreased from 10 infants to 1 between the control group and post-intervention groups. There were no negative outcomes.

View Full Presentation Information
Durations: 45 mins
Dr. Nils Bergman, MB ChB, MPH, MD
The Neuroscience behind the skin-to-skin imperative
South Africa Dr. Nils Bergman, MB ChB, MPH, MD

Dr Nils Bergman calls himself a Public Health Physician, and currently promotes and researches skin-to-skin contact on a fulltime basis.

He is an Honorary Senior Lecturer at the University of Cape Town, South Africa, and a research affiliate of the South African Medical Research Council.

Dr. Bergman was born in Sweden and raised in Zimbabwe, where he also later worked as a mission doctor. He received his medical degree (MB ChB) at the University of Cape Town, and later a Masters in Public Health at the University of the Western Cape. During his years in Zimbabwe he completed a doctoral dissertation (MD, equivalent to PhD) on scorpion stings. He has worked in rural South Africa, Zimbabwe and Sweden, and his last posting was Senior Medical Superintendent of Mowbray Maternity Hospital in Cape Town, overseeing 18000 births per year.

He enjoys sharing the wildlife of Africa with his wife and three youngsters.

Objective 1: Recognize the fundamental role of skin-to-skin contact for neonatal well being.
Objective 2: Support early suckling for successful breastfeeding
Objective 3: Motivate for change hospital policies that prevent mother infant togetherness immediately after birth.

South Africa Dr. Nils Bergman, MB ChB, MPH, MD
Abstract:

The underlying science to all biology is that genes make brains and bodies, and brains make those bodies behave to accomplish ‘reproductive fitness’. Recent advances have shown that the ENVIRONMENT influences the genes through epigenetic processes, and fires and wires brain circuits, and also determines highly conserved behaviors necessary for fitness. Human reproductive fitness begins with birth and breastfeeding, and the necessary environment is maternal-infant SKIN-TO-SKIN CONTACT (SSC). Essential steps are described, transition to extrauterine life, maternal regulation, biological roots of bonding, breastfeeding as an integrated behavior with sleep, with early maternal sensitization and later attuned parenting. The opposite of SSC is SEPARATION, leading to toxic stress with a number of mal-adaptions that may remain for life. The most significant relate to emotional and social intelligence, and failures in breastfeeding. The ecobiodevelopmental model captures this accurately, but must be applied at birth to accomplish fitness for early childhood development.

View Full Presentation Information
Durations: 45 mins
Simran Noor, MSSP/MPA
Health Equity: An Issue for Breastfeeding?
USA Simran Noor, MSSP/MPA

As Director of Policy & Strategy, Simran conducts policy research and analysis, cultivates and maintains relationships with grassroots and national allies and works closely with the data-based research team for advocacy strategy and tool development.
Simran leads CSI’s Transportation Equity team. In her role, Simran has conducted several workshops in transportation equity policy strategy development and coalition building, particularly in the metro Detroit and metro Seattle regions. Simran also is a key internal partner for CSI’s Food Equity team, supporting policy development, research and convenings. In addition, Simran coordinates CSI’s work around Broadband equity and developing a racial equity lens for breastfeeding, core to the W.K. Kellogg Foundation’s first food initiative. Simran also has worked on health equity issues, serving as an opening plenary speaker at the W.K. Kellogg Foundation’s second annual First Food Forum and as a workshop facilitator to delve deeper into the overall issue of health equity and its relationship to breastfeeding.
Prior to joining the Center for Social Inclusion, Simran served as Program Manager at the W.K. Kellogg Foundation where she worked with the Food, Health & Well-being, Racial Equity and Civic & Community Engagement portfolios. She also served as Program Assistant at the Annie E. Casey Foundation where she supported the Policy Research and KIDS COUNT teams. Simran is deeply committed to youth development, having worked in organizational development and as frontline staff for the Holistic Life Foundation, a Baltimore-based yoga and mindfulness program, and as a language arts and community engagement teacher for middle school students through the Middle Grades Partnership.
Simran holds a dual bachelor’s degree in American Studies and Political Science from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County and a dual master’s degree in Public Administration and Social Policy from the University of Pennsylvania.

Objective 1: Elevate the importance of racial and health equity to the work of birth and breastfeeding.
Objective 2: Identify the differences between individual, institutional and structural racism and implicit/explicit bias.
Objective 3: Begin to generate ideas or thinking about next steps.

USA Simran Noor, MSSP/MPA
Abstract:

Using an equity analysis is key to achieving optimal breastfeeding rates for all mothers and babies. Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine has been working to incorporate a system based root cause analysis into their work, as organization and in the field. Center of Social Inclusion has been supporting the field in thinking about how to incorporate a structural lens into work around birth and breastfeeding. In this presentation, we overview a structural race analysis, share specific implications for breastfeeding and first food policy and practice.

View Full Presentation Information
Durations: 45 mins
GOLD Kergie Leitgeb, MD, IBCLC
       Monica Vilela Carceles Fraguas, MD, IBCLC
       Amal El Taweel, MD, PhD

MD Dr. Kergi Leitgeb, IBCLC is a General Practitioner in private practice specializing in the care of breastfeeding mothers with a focus on medical issues of lactation including sucking skills, tongue-tie and medications during breastfeeding.
She has been working in lactation counselling for over 10 years with La Leche League and for the Public Health Initiative for breastfeeding. In 2012 she completed the IBCLC exam and started to work as an independent lactation consultant. Besides her work in private practice, she continues to work as a GP doing locums and on-call duty for the Red Cross.
Dr. Leitgeb is involved in activities with La Leche League Austria, such as training of new counselors, representing the Association of Breastfeeding Lactation Austria in her region and initiates and organizes many events related to breastfeeding. She is an accredited assessor for BFHI and has been involved with several hospital accreditations in Austria.

Monica Vilela Carceles Fraguas: Graduation: 1983, University of Sao Paulo, School of Medicine Residence in Pediatrics: 1984/1985, Hospital das Clinicas - School of Medicine - University of Sao Paulo Training in Neonatology: 1986, Hospital das Clinicas - School of Medicine - University of Sao Paulo Clinical practice in Neonatology since 1987 Chief of the Well Newborn Nursery of Promatre Paulista since 2009 Medical Coordinator of the Breastfeeding Supporting Group in Promatre Paulista

Dr. Amal El Taweel, MD, IBCLC Graduate of Cairo Faculty of Medicine (1986). Master's of pediatrics, Cairo University (1992). Doctorate of Pediatrics, Al Azhar University (2002). Devoted to breastfeeding promotion since certification as IBCLC in 2003. Treasurer, Executive manager and educational coordinator of the Egyptian Lactation Consultants' Association (ELCA). Director and main lecturer of the reputable Certificate Program of Lactation Management conducted by ELCA since 2004 whose graduates are around 400 Egyptian and some Arab IBCLCs and replicating the same course in Madinah Monawarah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, since October 2015 and Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, recently this March 2016 . Member of International Lactation Consultant Association (ILCA) since 2008 and ILCA multicultural committee since 2011. Member of the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine since 2009. International Baby Food Action Network (IBFAN) Arab World since 2009. Speaker in many national, Arab and international conferences e.g. ILCA/ VELB 2010 in Basel Switzerland, ILCA 2012 in Orlando USA, ILCA 2015 in Washington DC USA and presenter of many web seminars. Author of many internationally published papers in the field of lactation. I conduct research in diverse areas of lactation like growth, development, microbiology, parasitology, physiotherapy, professional development, neonatology and pediatrics.
Moderator: Wendy Brodribb, MPPBS, PhD, FABM

Objective 1: Identify briefly sources and methodology of obtaining religious ruling in Islam.
Objective 2: Appreciate concerns of Muslim families over issues of milk sharing and milk kinship.
Objective 3: Relate the milk kinship religious ruling to the newly discovered epigenetic effect of human milk.
Objective 4: Know about the origins of milkbanking
Objective 5: Have an overview about ways of formal and informal milksharing in Austria
Objective 6:Learn two unusual cases of informal milk-sharing
Objective 7:describe the most relevant aspects of the Brazilian Milk Bank Network;
Objective 8: explain the role of the Milk Bank Network in Brazil
Objective 9: describe the most relevant aspects of informal milk sharing in Brazil

GOLD Kergie Leitgeb, MD, IBCLC
       Monica Vilela Carceles Fraguas, MD, IBCLC
       Amal El Taweel, MD, PhD
Abstract:

Milk Sharing in Islam:

  • The primary source of legislation is Quraan, the holy scripture, followed by the Sunnah of Prophet Mohammad interpreting and applying the Quraan, then scholarly reasoning applying basic rules in obtaining religious rulings.
  • Basic rules to direct reasoning and set priorities:
  • Seeking simplicity.
  • Preserving life.
  • Preventing damage has priority over bringing benefit.

Milk Sharing in Austria:
Actual benefits have priority over possible benefits.Informal Milksharing or wetnursing happend throughout the history of humans. Only the last 100 years it became a matter of getting institutionalised. Milk banking was devoloped in Austria as part of a public health campaign. This presentation gives you a glimpse on the history of Milk banking in Austria, tells you the many ways how milk is shared currently in the heart of central Europe and gives you two short examples how mothers managed so their baby would receive human milk, when they were not able to. One adopted her child from a lay-mother, the other mother had to be in intensive care shortly after delivery.

Brazil has a formal milk sharing system and an informal practice.Formal Milk Sharing was established during the 20th century with the organization of the Brazilian Milk Bank Network. Today it has more than 210 centers and is present in every state of the country. The Network:
  • promotes health for women and children,
  • generates and disseminates scientific and technological knowledge,
  • integrates and builts partnerships with federal and private organizations.
  • promotes and supports Breastfeeding;
  • collects and distributes certified human milk.
  • contributes to decrease child mortality rate
  • contributes to install Milk Banks other countries.

Cross breastfeeding is not recommended by the Secretary of Health in Brazil, and selling and purchasing human milk is forbidden by national law. There are few papers about cross breastfeeding in Brazil, but they suggest that this practice is very common although not recommended.

View Full Presentation Information
Durations: 15 mins
Determinatns of Timely Introduction of Complimentary Feeding in India: Secondary Analysis of National Survey Data 1992- 2006

Dr. Nomita Chandhiok is Senior Deputy Director General/Scientist ‘G’ at the Indian Council of Medical Research, the apex research organization and advisory body to the government of India. She is the programme officer for Women’s Health and HIV prevention technologies at the Council and responsible for coordinating and promoting programmatically relevant research in these areas. Specializing in Obstetrics and Gynecology, she has been involved in conducting multicentre clinical evaluation of newer reproductive health technologies and clinical and operational research studies in the field of sexual and Reproductive Health since 1981. Her keen involvement in issues related to the sexual and reproductive health of women and adolescents has led to several studies addressing the high maternal mortality and morbidity in India being translated into policy. Dr. Chandhiok is a member of several international advisory groups, professional bodies and Task Force committees of various scientific organizations and has over 60 publications in peer reviewed journals.

Objective 1: Significance of appropriate complementary feeding interventions for optimal growth
Objective 2: Usefulness of national survey data to study prevalence and change over time in the key determinants of early and timely complimentary food
Objective 3: Breast feeding practices in India continue to be sub-optimal with no appreciable gains in the last 13 years.Need for renewed focus and vitality in health programs for promoting and supporting IYCF practices

Abstract:

To determine the changes in the prevalence andkey determinants of timely initiation of complementary feeding among infants in India, secondary data analysis of two rounds of India’s National surveys conducted in the year 1992-93(NFHS-1)and 2005-06 (NFHS-3) was carried out. Early and timely introduction of complementary feeding at four and six months of age respectively are taken as the study variables and examined against demographic, socio-economic and health service availed variables using multinomial logistic regression along with multiple classification analysis.The early introduction of complementary feeding among 39% infants in NFHS-3 as compared to 30% in NFHS-1 is indicative of a worsening trend. Overall, there is a 10% increase in timely introduction of complementary feeding in NFHS-3 with 54% infants receiving it. Urban place of residence, higher educational attainment of mother, medium wealth index and perceived small size of baby at birth are associated with early introduction of complimentary feeding. Living in urban area, and perceived small size at birth are associated with timely complimentary feeding rates in both the surveys. Mothers being more literate, in non-gainful occupation and belonging to high wealth index were the other predictors associated with enhanced timely complimentary feeding in NFHS-1. While in NFHS-3, in infants of mothers who had availed health services like antenatal/natal care, there was a greater likelihood of timely introduction of complementary feeding.

View Full Presentation Information
Durations: 15 mins
Ellen Chetwynd, PHD, MPH, RN, BSN, IBCLC
Cumulative Lactation and Middle Aged Onset of Hypertesnsion in African American women
USA Ellen Chetwynd, PHD, MPH, RN, BSN, IBCLC

Ellen is a breastfeeding researcher and lactation consultant working on postdoctoral research at North Carolina State University after completing her doctoral work at UNC in Maternal/Child Health and Epidemiology. Her career in perinatal health has included work as a Program Director, Lactation Consultant, and Perinatal Nurse. She founded two lactation consultant practices, one in a Family Medicine service, and the second in an out of hospital birth center, where she maintains an active practice. Her specialty is working with maternal pain through assessment and treatment of infant physiology. Her goal is to bring her model to communities with limited existing lactation support. She co-directs her professional organization, and works with a legislative committee on reimbursement of lactation services by Medicaid. Her breastfeeding research includes pain with breastfeeding, breast milk induction, the profession of lactation consulting, and metabolic health and breastfeeding. Today’s presentation is from her dissertation.

Objective 1: Review importance of equity in research populations for both breastfeeding and hypertension
Objective 2: Describe the benefits of a nested case control design in limiting both selection and survival bias when studying the association between cumulative lifetime lactation and hypertension
Objective 3: Quantify the protective association between cumulative lifetime lactation and hypertension.

USA Ellen Chetwynd, PHD, MPH, RN, BSN, IBCLC
Abstract:

Hypertension affects nearly one of three women in the United States. Breastfeeding leads to metabolic changes that could reduce risks of hypertension. Hypertension disproportionately affects black women, but rates of breastfeeding lag behind the general population. In the Black Women’s Health Study (N = 59,001), we conducted a nested case control analysis using unconditional logistic regression to estimate the association between breastfeeding and incident hypertension at ages 40-65. Controls were frequency matched 2:1 to 12,513 hypertensive cases by age and questionnaire cycle. Overall, there was little evidence of association between ever-breastfeeding and incident hypertension (Odds ratio 0.97, 95% CI: 0.92, 1.02). However, age modified the relationship (P = 0.02): breastfeeding was associated with reduced risk of hypertension at ages 40-49 (Odds ratio 0.92, 95% CI: 0.85, 0.99) but not older ages. Our results suggest long-duration breastfeeding may reduce incident hypertension in middle age.

View Full Presentation Information
Durations: 15 mins
Laurie Nommsen-Rivers, PhD, RD, IBCLC
Milk Production in Mothers with and without Signs of Insulin Resistance
USA Laurie Nommsen-Rivers, PhD, RD, IBCLC

Laurie Nommsen-Rivers has been a Registered Dietitian since 1990 and an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant (IBCLC) since 1993. Laurie served as the Associate Editor of the Journal of Human Lactation from 1997- 2006. Laurie received her master’s degree in Nutrition from UC Davis, after which she worked with hundreds of breastfeeding mother-infant dyads during her 18 years as a research associate with Kathryn Dewey. Motivated by a desire to advance the field of human lactation, Laurie returned to the University of California in 2004 to obtain a PhD in epidemiology. Between 2009 and 2016 Laurie was an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics in the Division of Neonatology at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. Since September of this year she is an Associate Professor of Nutrition, and the Ruth Rosevear Endowed Chair of Maternal and Child Nutrition, at the University of Cincinnati. She has co-authored over 70 research publications related to the breastfeeding dyad with a focus on barriers that impede lactation success.

Objective 1: insulin plays a direct and significant role in stimulating milk synthesis in the mammary gland
Objective 2: among mothers with low milk supply striving to exclusively breastfeed, mothers with signs of insulin resistance made significantly less milk than mothers without signs of insulin resistance
Objective 3: not all obese mothers have trouble breastfeeding, but those with signs of insulin resistance may be particularly at risk for lactation difficulty
Objective 4: inability to exclusively breastfeed may be more common than previously believed, especially in settings where poor metabolic health is common

USA Laurie Nommsen-Rivers, PhD, RD, IBCLC
Abstract:

Laurie Nommsen-Rivers, PhD; Sarah Riddle1, MD; Amy Thompson2, MD; Laura Ward1, MD; and Erin Wagner1, MS. 1Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center and 2University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, Ohio

Background: Maternal obesity is associated with shortened breastfeeding duration. Insulin resistance is a physiologic hallmark of obesity and may underlie lactation difficulties.
Objective: Our objective is to compare 24-hour milk production in mothers with signs of insulin resistance (IR) versus those without.
Methods: We examined baseline data from the MALMS study, a randomized placebo-controlled trial of metformin to augment low milk supply. Baseline eligibility includes: mother 1-8 weeks postpartum, healthy term infant, and currently supplementing, but strong desire to achieve exclusive breastfeeding. At baseline, all women record 24 hour milk production and are evaluated for the following signs of IR: fasting plasma glucose > 95 mg/dL, abdominal obesity, recent gestational diabetes, or polycystic ovary syndrome. We compared baseline 24-hour milk production in IR versus no IR groups, and then in obese versus non-obese groups. Results: 33 (69%) exhibited signs of IR and 15 had no IR signs. Mean age (+SD) of mother (31+5 years) and infant (4+2 weeks) did not differ between groups, but BMI was significantly higher in the IR group (36.9+7.9 versus 25.4+3.6 kg/m2, P<0.001). Relative ranking of milk production was significantly lower in IR versus no-IR: Median [interquartile range], 216[158-332] versus 377[294-598] mL/day, P=0.004; and differences were less pronounced when milk output compared for obese versus non-obese, P=0.05.

Conclusion: While poor lactation management may have contributed to low production in some participants, our results point to an additional deficit associated with IR.
Funding source: NIH 5 K12 HD051953 (PI, Tsevat), Bridging Interdisciplinary Research Careers in Women’s Health (BIRCWH award to LN-R).

View Full Presentation Information
Durations: 15 mins
Mother's Concerns for Personal Safety/Vulnerability While Breastfeeding: An Unexplored Phenomenon

Dr. Rosen-Carole is Medical Director of Lactation Services and Programs at the University of Rochester. She trained at New York Medical College and completed a residency in Pediatrics at Yale New Haven Children’s Hospital. She was a practicing community pediatrician and residency faculty from 2008-2014, in New Haven, CT then in New York's Hudson Valley before relocating to Rochester to do a fellowship in Breastfeeding Medicine and General Academic Pediatrics. Dr. Rosen-Carole was in the National Health Service Corps from 2010-2014 working in Federally Qualifying Health Centers, which helped her fulfill her mission of increasing access and quality of care for at-risk children. She practices outpatient and inpatient Breastfeeding Medicine and Pediatrics. Her research focus has been in systems change for breastfeeding education and support. Other areas of interest include community organizing to address social determinants of health, programming for diversity and equity, and incorporating Human Centered Design principles into quality improvement initiatives.

Objective 1: Discuss the safety concerns around breastfeeding expressed by an inner-city population
Objective 2: Discuss the relative impacts of these concerns on breastfeeding initiation
Objective 3: Understand the potential variability of these concerns by sociodemographic variables

Abstract:

Background: Preliminary research in upstate NY shows new mothers are worried about safety while breastfeeding (BF). We sought to determine the frequency of BF safety/privacy concerns and explore their association with BF outcomes. Mothers were surveyed immediately and 1-month postpartum about breastfeeding goals and privacy/safety concerns.

Results: 279 women enrolled. Almost all women felt safe breastfeeding at home, though 25% reported privacy concerns and 5% felt ‘vulnerable or unsafe’ while BF. Non-BF mothers expressed more safety concerns outside home/at work. Only 54% who reported feeling vulnerable/unsafe with BF initiated breastfeeding, compared with 86% not reporting this concern (p=0.008). Fewer women initiating BF reported vulnerability/safety or privacy concerns.

Conclusion: Many BF women reported safety/privacy concerns, especially outside the home and at work, which may influence BF initiation. Further study may lead to methods to address these issues potentially increasing BF rates.

View Full Presentation Information
Durations: 45 mins
Extending Breastfeeding among Black and Latina Mothers: Preparing Women for the Postpartum Period

Elizabeth A. Howell, M.D., M.P.P. is Vice Chair of Research for the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Science and Associate Director for the Center for Health Equity and Community Engaged Research at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. She is an ob/gyn health services researcher and her research interests include understanding and narrowing racial disparities in health and healthcare and addressing the health needs of low-income women of color, especially as they relate to antepartum and postpartum care. She is a NIH-funded researcher and has conducted randomized trials testing interventions aimed at reducing postpartum depression and increasing breastfeeding duration among women of color. She has served on several expert panels including for the Institute of Medicine, the Joint Commission, The American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, and NIH. Dr. Howell received her undergraduate degree from Stanford University and received her medical and public policy degrees at Harvard Medical School and the Harvard Kennedy School of Government. She received her residency training at Cornell /New York Hospital and is a board certified obstetrician gynecologist. Dr. Howell received her training in clinical epidemiology as a Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholar at Yale Medical School.

Objective 1: Describe racial/ethnic disparities in US breastfeeding rates
Objective 2: To discuss the link between breastfeeding and postpartum depressive symptoms
Objective 3: To discuss the link between lack of preparation for the postpartum period with breastfeeding
Objective 4: To report findings from a behavioral educational intervention aimed at improving breastfeeding rates among self-identified black and Latina mothers.

Abstract:

Breastfeeding provides substantial health benefits for children and mothers and the American Academy of Pediatrics strongly recommends breastfeeding for the first year of life. Each additional week of breastfeeding confers benefit. Unfortunately, significant racial/ethnic disparities in breastfeeding initiation and duration exist in the US with black and some Latina women having lower rates of both as compared with white women. Research demonstrates that there is a link between depressive symptoms and breastfeeding duration and that lack of preparation for common physical and emotional symptoms and experiences which occur in the postpartum period may be associated with both. We share results from a randomized trial which tested a behavioral educational intervention with the secondary aim of increasing breastfeeding duration among self-identified black and Latina mothers.

View Full Presentation Information
Durations: 60 mins
USA Dana Silver, MD, FAAP, FABM
       Early Harley, MD
       Robert Marcus, MD

Dr. Dana Silver is a general pediatrician and Director at Greenspring Pediatric Associates, the outpatient department for the Herman and Walter Samuelson Children’s Hospital at Sinai in Baltimore. She is Clinical Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. She received her B.S. from Cornell University in 1987, and her M.D. from University of Maryland in 1991. She then completed residency and chief residency at Rainbow Babies and Children’s Hospital in Cleveland.

Dr. Silver’s interests within the field of general pediatrics span the diverse areas of breastfeeding, and learning and behavior problems in children. She co-authored the 2010 American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) book “Guide to Learning Disabilities for Primary Care.” In terms of breastfeeding, she has lectured extensively across the mid-Atlantic region on breastfeeding, and has worked on advocacy and legislative issues including the use of donor human milk in Maryland’s NICU’s and insurance coverage of breast pumps. She recently developed and recorded 3 hours of CME webinars for physicians at hospitals preparing to go Baby Friendly through Lactation Education Resources.

Dr. Silver serves currently as Vice President of the Maryland Breastfeeding Coalition and Breastfeeding Coordinator for the Maryland Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics. In 2013, Dr. Silver received the honor of being named a Fellow of the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine, one of fewer than 200 worldwide. In 2014, the Maryland Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics named her Pediatrician of the Year.

Robert M. Marcus, DDS
For more than forty years, I have endeavored to contribute to the health, happiness, and well¬-being of my amazing family: Judi, Rachel, David, Emily, Benjamin, and Jackson. After my formal education at the University of Maryland, Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, including specialized training at the Kennedy Krieger Institute at Johns Hopkins Hospital, I was fortunate to open my pediatric dental office in Reisterstown Maryland. My practice focuses on complete, compassionate dental services for infants, children, teens, adults, and those with special needs.
The rewarding experiences in the treatment of thousands of babies and older patients by dental laser surgery for their lip and tongue ties have encouraged me to enhance my education. Additional training in breastfeeding medicine, speech and language pathology, skeletal development, feeding disorders, and cranial sacral therapy, will provide lifelong improvement in feeding and oral motor skills for my patients. My commitment to continuing education allows me to discover and share the newest advances in dentistry and oral healthcare with my patients and colleagues. I truly enjoy being a part of my family’s fun activities by traveling to visit my daughter Rachel in New York City, my son David and his wife Emily in Massachusetts, and my future partners, their twins, Ben and Jack (18 months). My camera is always at the ready whether we are swimming, sightseeing, or doing obstacle course racing, (Spartan races). I have to keep active because my wife is a world class chef! Always learning!

Earl H. Harley, M.D.
I was born in Jacksonville, Florida and reared in Detroit, Michigan. I attended the public school system in Detroit, graduating from the former Eastern High School. I eventually enrolled in Delaware State University, graduating with a degree in chemistry. I attended medical school at Howard University. After medical school I went on active duty and served a full career as a doctor from a period which spanned the Vietnam War to the first Persian Gulf War. My Navy career included two tours as a Naval Fight Surgeon in addition to my position as an Otolaryngologist. Since retiring from the Navy I have served on the faculty of Georgetown University.
My professional training includes an initial residency in pediatrics and later training to become an Otolaryngologist followed by two years of pediatric otolaryngology fellowship in Washington, D.C. and Boston. I am a diplomat of the American Board of Otolaryngology and a Fellow of the American College of Surgeons. In addition to being a member of the American Medical Association, I also hold memberships in the National Medical Association, The American Society of Pediatric Otolaryngology, The Society for Ear Nose and Throat Advances in Children, and the American Academy of Pediatrics.
Currently I am a professor of Pediatrics and Otolaryngologist at Georgetown and serve as an attending Pediatric Otolaryngologist. I continue to be very active in undergraduate and graduate medical education here.

Objective 1: Restate the challenges ankyloglossia may cause in breastfeeding mother-infant dyads and the controversies in its management.
Objective 2: Review the two approaches to frenotomies and their pros and cons.
Objective 3: Discuss the impact lip ties may have on breastfeeding.

USA Dana Silver, MD, FAAP, FABM
       Early Harley, MD
       Robert Marcus, MD
Abstract:

Ankyloglossia in a breastfeeding infant may prevent the infant from latching well, and from achieving the proper suction and peristaltic motion needed to extract and move milk to the back of the mouth. This program will include a review by a pediatrician of the challenges and controversies in diagnosis and management of ankyloglossia. An ENT will discuss his experiences with the condition and what he describes as the unfavorable triad, which puts a mother-infant dyad at risk of having more problems with ankyloglossia and breastfeeding. A dentist will discuss his experiences with both tongue and lip tie.

View Full Presentation Information
Durations: 45 mins
Founders' Lecture "Breastfeeding Research in Pelotas: How Science Can Influence Global Policy"

Cesar G. Victora MD is Emeritus Professor of Epidemiology at the Federal University of Pelotas in Brazil, where he works since 1977. He has honorary appointments at Harvard, Oxford and Johns Hopkins Universities, and at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. He has conducted extensive research in maternal and child health and nutrition, long-term birth cohort studies, inequalities in health, and on the evaluation of the impact of major global health programs. In the 1980's, he was the first researcher to show the protective effect of exclusive breastfeeding against infant mortality, and one of the leaders of the creation of the World Health Child Growth Standards based on breastfed infants. He is one of the founding members of the “Countdown to 2015: Maternal, Newborn and Child Health” initiative aimed at monitoring the Millennium Development Goals. In Pelotas, he coordinates the International Center for Equity in Health, where he carries out cohort studies as well as global reviews of levels and trends of inequalities in maternal and child health. He has over 650 peer-reviewed publications and is a member of the editorial boards of several journals, including The Lancet. He was President of the International Epidemiological Association (2011-14).

Objective 1: Describe how research studies provided the evidence supporting exclusive breastfeeding for 6 months.
Objective 2: Describe the advantages of using growth standards based on breastfed children.
Objective 3: Describe the evidence on the long-term consequences of artificial feeding

Abstract:

I discussed how the research on breastfeeding carried out at the Federal University of Pelotas (Brazil) has helped shape global policies on the recommendation for exclusive breastfeeding for 6 months, the use of child growth standards based on breastfed children, and the harmful long-term consequences of artificial feeding.

View Full Presentation Information
Durations: 45 mins
USA Maya Bolman, RN
       Ann Witt, MD, FABM

Maya Bolman was born and raised in Minsk, Belarus. Certified as IBCLC in 2001, she currently works as inpatient lactation consultant at Hillcrest Hospital Cleveland Clinic. Since 2009, she also works as lactation consultant in a large pediatric and breastfeeding medicine practice. Maya Bolman is internationally known for her work promoting hand expression and breast massage to breastfeeding mothers. She recognizes that teaching mothers these basic tools helps empower them to work through breastfeeding challenges including engorgement, plugged ducts, separation from the infant, and milk supply concerns. She has worked with Dr. Ann Witt to create an instructional video “The Basics of Breast Massage and Hand Expression” and conduct research on the effectiveness of Therapeutic Breast Massage in Lactation (TBML) both in the office and as a treatment at home for mothers.

Dr. Witt founded Breastfeeding Medicine of Northeast Ohio in 2008. She is a board-certified family physician and Fellow of the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine. Dr. Witt graduated from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and completed her residency in Family Medicine at the University of Washington in Seattle. Dr. Witt has conducted clinical research on pediatric post-partum lactation support, engorgement, therapeutic breast massage, and infectious causes of chronic breast pain.

Objective 1: Describe the role of breast massage in different cultures and discuss the possible mechanisms why massage can help.
Objective 2: Identify reasons for acute breast pain and discuss the role of Therapeutic Breast Massage in treatment of engorgement, plugged duct and mastitis.
Objective 3: Demonstrate Breast Massage and Hand Expression Techniques: General Principles: Alternate:

USA Maya Bolman, RN
       Ann Witt, MD, FABM
Abstract:

Breast pain is one of the major causes of weaning. The likelihood of weaning increases the longer pain persists. Engorgement, plugged ducts, blebs and mastitis are commonly associated with acute breast pain. Therapeutic Breast Massage in Lactation (TBML) is one of the important measures to resolve pain quickly.
The purpose of this presentation is to enhance knowledge of TBML techniques for relieving discomfort caused by engorgement, plugged ducts and mastitis in lactating women and learn how to empower breastfeeding mothers to use these techniques as well.

View Full Presentation Information
Durations: 30 mins
UNICEF/WHO Global Breastfeeding Advocacy Initiative

Maaike Arts is Nutrition Specialist (IYCN) with UNICEF New York. She holds a Master’s Degree in Nutrition from Wageningen University in The Netherlands. Maaike joined UNICEF in 1996 and worked with UNICEF in Pakistan, Honduras, Viet Nam and Mozambique. Maaike also worked with the International Babyfood Action Network (IBFAN) in The Netherlands and with the Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation (EGPAF) in Mozambique. Maaike’s main area of work has been Nutrition, and she also worked in the areas of HIV and AIDS and Early Childhood Care. She joined UNICEF New York HQ in August 2014.

Objective 1:Describe global breastfeeding rates
Objective 2: Describe in which way mothers need support to breastfeeding
Objective 3: Describe the work of the Breastfeeding Advocacy Initiative

Abstract:

Breastfeeding ensures a healthy start in life and makes economic sense. Infants under 6 months should be exclusively breastfed, yet only 37% do. In low and middle income countries, this is 43%. The global target is to increase the rate of exclusive breastfeeding for the first 6 months to at least 50%. Mothers need support to breastfeed. A UNICEF report showed that early initiation of breastfeeding was not facilitated by the presence of a doctor, nurse or midwife.

The Breastfeeding Advocacy Initiative’s (BAI), established in 2014, is led by UNICEF and WHO and has 18 member organizations. The Initiative advocates for increased political commitment to and investment for breastfeeding. The BAI has crafted a Call to Action, successfully leveraged strategic advocacy opportunities and developed a communication plan based on audience research. The BAI appeals to members to participate actively in the work, and to non-members to consider joining the Initiative.

View Full Presentation Information
Durations: 60 mins
Anne Eglash, MD, FABM
Amy G. Bryant, MD, MSCR
New Guidelines, Old Debate: Contraception and Breastfeeding
USA Anne Eglash, MD, FABM
       Amy G. Bryant, MD, MSCR

Anne Eglash MD, IBCLC, FABM, is a clinical professor with the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, in the Department of Family and Community Medicine. In addition to practicing family medicine, she has been a board certified lactation consultant since 1994. Anne is a cofounder of the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine, and is the medical director and cofounder of the Mothers’ Milk Bank of the Western Great Lakes. She is the medical director of the University of Wisconsin Lactation Services, and the medical director of the outpatient lactation program at Meriter Hospital in Madison, Wisconsin.
She has published many peer- reviewed articles on breastfeeding medicine, and has special research interests in chronic breast pain, human milk storage, and nipple shield use. She sits on the editorial board for Breastfeeding Medicine Journal.
She co-hosts and produces a free breastfeeding medicine podcast series, co-sponsored by The Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine, called The Breastfeeding Medicine Podcast, available on itunes.
In 2014 Dr. Eglash founded The Milk Mob, a nonprofit organization dedicated to optimizing outpatient breastfeeding support for families thru the creation of Breastfeeding Friendly Medical Systems.

Amy G. Bryant, MD, MSCR, is Assistant Professor in the Division of Family Planning in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at UNC-Chapel Hill, and Assistant Director of the Fellowship in Family Planning. She completed the Fellowship in Family Planning at UNC-Chapel Hill, and a Master’s of Science in Clinical Research at the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health in 2011. She works as a generalist OB/GYN with a specialty in Family Planning. Her research interests include the provision of long-acting, reversible contraception in the postpartum period, and equitable access to evidence-based abortion information and care. After experiencing a stark decrease in her breastmilk supply in her second pregnancy, she developed an interest in the effects of family planning on breastfeeding. She became part of a working group at UNC evaluating the impacts of hormonal contraception on breastmilk. She also evaluates the ethical and practical intersections of family planning and lactation counseling.
Moderator: Joan Meek, MD, FAAP, IBCLC, FABM: Pediatrics

Objective 1: Learners will understand why there is a study of the impact of progestins on breastmilk.
Objective 2: Learners will understand the methods used for this study
Objective 3: Learners will understand the results of this study
Objective 4: Learners will understand the implications and limitations of this study.

USA Anne Eglash, MD, FABM
       Amy G. Bryant, MD, MSCR
Abstract:

In published studies, hormonal contraception (HC) has not been found to affect breastfeeding outcomes. However, early introduction of exogenous progestins may inhibit or prevent adequate breastfeeding in some women. We sought to estimate the proportion of women who perceive breastmilk production to be affected by hormonal contraception by conducting an anonymous, Internet-based survey of adult postpartum women regarding their experiences with postpartum events, including initiating contraception, resuming intercourse, and breastfeeding. The survey was introduced via social media, listservs, and websites. From January to May 2016, 2920 women completed the survey and met inclusion criteria. Milk supply concerns occurred in 1044 (37.6%) of participants in the first 12 weeks postpartum and were more common among HC users than non-users (42.5 vs 35.5%, p<0.01. Understanding the complex relationship between hormonal contraception, breastfeeding, and other events in the postpartum period is essential to providing care for lactating women.

View Full Presentation Information
Durations: 15 mins
Fetal and Labor Stress and Breastfeeding

EDUCATION: Tbilisi State Medical University with honours; Wellstart Int.,Lactation Management course, San-Diego, USA; Institute of Pediatrics, Moscow, Russia; Ph.D. course. Working experience: Chief Pediatrician of Georgia; President of NGO/UNICEF Regional Network for Children of CEE/CIS and the Baltic States elected for two terms. AWARDS: Georgian National Academy of Science Awards For Science Achievements In Medicine; SOUTHEAST European Medical Forum Awards for contribution to medical science development; Title of the Best doctor of Georgia; Certificate of Achievement for successful participation in a technical cooperation program -Agency for Development of the Government, Washington, USA. PUBLICATIONS: Author of more than 100 medical articles including manuals; 2 copyright patent certificate; Co-author of Georgian Law on “Protection and Promotion of Breastfeeding and Regulation of Artificial feeding;

Objective 1: Influence of maternal stress (mild and severe) during pregnancy on breastfeed
Objective 2: Influence of maternal stress (mild and severe) during pregnancy on mother-child bonding.
Objective 3: Influence of maternal stress and anxiety during pregnancy on short term(breastfed, mother-child bonding) and long-term (child’s global development. adhd ,early childhood wheezing and asthma) effects on her offspring.

Abstract:

Background: The effects of fetal emotional stress on lactation are not known. Objective: To assess the association’s influence of maternal stress (mild and severe) during pregnancy on breastfeed and mother-child bonding. Materials/methods: We conducted a prospective study of 15 women in which were observed the pregnant and delivery and took blood samples for analysis of stress hormone. Each day during the first 1 week postpartum, the mothers collected a milk sample. Result: Multiple regressions indicated that several markers of fetal stress were associated with delayed breast fullness, lower milk volume. 2. The factors associated with lactogenesis were parity (P<0.10), maternal exhaustion (P0.10) for timing of breast fullness; exhaustion (P0.10) and lower breast-feeding frequency on day 2(P0.005). Conclusion: Mothers who with severe stres during pregnancy and after childbirth should receive additional lactation guidance during the first week postpartum. It is worked out in the framework of the project of Rustaveli Scientific National Fund (project # DO385/8-308/14)

View Full Presentation Information
Durations: 45 mins
Uwe Ewald, MD, PhD
Breastfeeding Promotion in a Swedish NICU
Sweden Uwe Ewald, MD, PhD

Professor Ewald has over 30 years experience as a paediatrician/neonatologist. During his career he has had over 150 peer reviewed publications and is involved with many organizations in relation to the improvment of neonatal care. His recent research projects are focused on change processes of culture/climate in the NICU. He is evaluating the implementation of new care routines, research and knowledge translation, family centered care using parental empowerment, single room concept, kangaroo mother care and breastfeeding.

Objective 1: Effects of separation of the newborn infant from his mother will affect attachment/bonding, maternal and infant health
Objective 2: Factors facilitating closeness between newborn infant and his mother
Objective 3: How to support breastfeeding in the NICU context

Sweden Uwe Ewald, MD, PhD
Abstract:

Being separated from your newborn infant in the busy NICU environment is counteracting attachment and bonding, resulting in poor breastfeeding outcome. Changes in NICU design, promotion of a care culture towards more family integrated care, teaching staff on the benefits of breastfeeding and measuring breastfeeding outcomes have been important aspects in breastfeeding promotion in our NICU

View Full Presentation Information

Accreditation

CERPs - Continuing Education Recognition Points
GOLD Conferences has been designated as a Long Term Provider of CERPs by the IBLCE--Approval #CLT114-07
This program is approved for 13.5 CERPs (12 L, 0.75 E, 0.75 R CERPs)

CMEs - Continuing Medical Education credits for Physicans & Nurses:
This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the Essential Areas and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education through the joint providership of PESI Inc. and the GOLD Online Learning Education. PESI Inc. is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

The PESI Inc. designates this enduring educational activity for a maximum of 13.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Nursing CEUs - Nursing Contact Hours:
This continuing nursing education has been approved for 13.5 credits with: ANA-Massachusetts, an accredited approver by the American Nurses Credentialling Center's (ANCC) Commission on Accreditation.

If you have already participated in this program, you are not eligible to receive additional credits for viewing it again. Please sent us an email to team@goldlearning.com if you have any questions.

Tags / Categories

Breastfeeding and Lactation

How much time do I have to view the presentations?

  • The viewing time will be specified for each product. When you purchase multiple items in your cart, the viewing time becomes CUMULATIVE. Ex. Lecture 1= 2 weeks and Lecture Pack 2 = 4 Weeks, you will have a total of 6 weeks viewing time for ALL the presentations made in that purchase.
  • Time for viewing the talks begins once you purchase the product. For Live Webinars & Symposiums, the viewing period begins from when the live event takes place. Presentations can be accessed 24/7 and can be viewed as many times as you like during the viewing period.

What are bundled lectures?

  • Presentations may be available individually or via a bundled package. Bundled lectures are a set of lectures that have been put together based on a specific category or topic. Some lectures will be available in both individual and lecture form, whereas others will be available only via a bundled lecture pack.

Will there be Handouts?

  • YES! Each lecture comes with a PDF handout provided by the Speaker.

Some lectures include a Q&A, what does that mean?

  • During our online conferences, presentations that occur live are also followed by a short 15 minute Question & Answer Session. The Speaker addresses questions that were posted by Delegates during the presentation. We include the recording of these Q&A Sessions as a bonus for you.

How can I receive a Certificate?

  • Once you are done viewing the lecture or the lectures within a bundle, submit your attendance record in order to be able to download your certificate.
Start Learning Today!

Professionals that selected this package also viewed

Page   1 of 0