GOLD Learning Speakers

U.S.A.

Cynthia Good Mojab, MS, LMHCA, IBCLC, RLC, CATSM

  • Speaker Type: Main Presentations, Ethics Packs 2015, Alumni 2016, GOLD Lactation 2014, GOLD Lactation 2015, Mental Health Lecture Pack 2016, Advanced Clinical & Business Skills for Private Practice 2016, GOLD Lactation 2016
  • Country: U.S.A.
Biography:

Cynthia Good Mojab, MS Clinical Psychology, is a Clinical Counselor, International Board Certified Lactation Consultant, author, researcher, and internationally recognized speaker. She is also Certified in Acute Traumatic Stress Management. As one of a small group of mental health care providers in the world who are also IBCLCs, she has a strong interest in lactational psychology. She is the Director of LifeCircle Counseling and Consulting, LLC where she focuses on perinatal mental health care. She formerly served as Research Associate in the Publications Department of La Leche League International and was on the faculty of Parkland College. She has authored, contributed to, and provided editorial review of numerous publications related to breastfeeding, culture, and psychology. She brings the evidence and insights of psychology and lactation consulting to her presentations to help participants better understand and more effectively respond to the complex psychosocial realities of breastfeeding families living in diverse contexts.

CE Library Presentation(s) Available Online:
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Ready, Set, Listen! Preparing to Hear the Missing Voices of the Lactation Consultant Profession
Individuals and institutions within and outside of the lactation consultant profession are increasingly aware of inequity in access to becoming an IBCLC. ILCA, IBLCE, and LEAARC are co-sponsoring the 2014 Lactation Summit to begin addressing inequities within the lactation profession. “Ready, Set, Listen! Preparing to Hear the Missing Voices of the Lactation Consultant Profession” is a pre-Summit webinar that provides anticipatory guidance for the management of thoughts and feelings when encountering new information that conflicts with existing beliefs; helps Summit participants develop a common language and understanding of systems of privilege and oppression; explains the ethical rationale for learning to see and counter bias, privilege, and oppression in our field; offers a brief roadmap to beginning the journey of helping dismantle institutional oppression within our field; and gives guidance on how to effectively listen to the missing voices in the lactation consultant profession that will be heard at the Lactation Summit.
Presentations: 1  |  Hours / CE Credits: 1.5  |  Viewing Time: 2 Weeks
Hours / CE Credits: 1.5 (details)  |  Categories: Breastfeeding and Lactation, Ethics for Lactation Professionals
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Cultural Competence or Cultural Humility? A Roadmap for Lactation Specialists
Culture is an integral part of all encounters with breastfeeding families—whether the lactation specialist’s and the family’s cultural backgrounds are similar or dissimilar. Cultural competence is explicitly or implicitly mandated or recommended in codes of ethics, position statements, and legislation related to a variety of fields, including those that involve the provision of breastfeeding support. For example, IBCLCs are ethically required to provide culturally appropriate care. In spite of the mandate for cultural competence, there is a dearth of information in the field of breastfeeding support regarding its development. This session reviews the ethical call for the development of cultural competence. Five areas of cultural competence—including cultural awareness, knowledge, skill, encounters, and desire—are presented and contrasted with cultural humility. This session also offers 10 “guideposts” for lactation specialists to explore on the non-linear, lifelong, transformative journey of cultural humility.
Presentations: 5  |  Hours / CE Credits: 5  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
Hours / CE Credits: 1 (details)  |  Categories: Ethics for Lactation Professionals
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My Brain is Doing What? Bias, Ethics, and the Lactation Specialist
Providing unbiased services is explicitly or implicitly mandated or recommended in codes of ethics and position statements in many fields, including those that involve the provision of breastfeeding support. For example, IBCLCs are ethically required to “present information without personal bias” and to “treat all clients equitably without regard to age, ethnicity, national origin, marital status, religion, or sexual orientation.” Avoiding bias is not an act of will power or the natural result of “good character.” It requires ongoing development and application of specialized knowledge and skill. The field of cognitive psychology offers a wealth of research regarding bias. This session provides an overview of 1) the ethical call for the avoidance of bias by lactation specialists, 2) the nature of cognitive bias, 3) three bias-related cognitive processes that can unconsciously influence the thinking and behavior of lactation specialists, 4) risk factors for acting on bias, and 5) five strategies that can help lessen bias in breastfeeding support services.
Presentations: 3  |  Hours / CE Credits: 3  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
Hours / CE Credits: 1 (details)  |  Categories:
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It Wasn’t Supposed to be Like This: Traumatic Birth, Traumatic Stress, and Breastfeeding
Up to one third of mothers report experiencing birth trauma and postpartum symptoms of traumatic stress. Birth is traumatic when mothers experience or perceive a threat to life, serious injury, or threat to physical integrity (for themselves or their baby) or experience the death of their baby. Pre-existing risk factors and birth-related risk factors for traumatic birth are staggeringly common. Childbirth trauma and postpartum traumatic stress negatively impacts mothers and their babies, and can result in the undermining of breastfeeding, additional grief over the loss of breastfeeding, and increased health risks for mother and baby. This session offers a sensitive discussion of how traumatic birth experiences affect maternal mental health, mothering, breastfeeding, and lactation consulting. It includes the importance of recognizing the difference between postpartum depression and postpartum stress disorders in new mothers, screening mothers for traumatic stress, and referring potentially traumatized mothers for diagnosis and possible treatment.
Presentations: 28  |  Hours / CE Credits: 22.25  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / CE Credits: .75 (details)  |  Categories: Breastfeeding and Lactation
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Unpacking the Invisible Diaper Bag of White Privilege: An Overview of Racial Inequities in Breastfeeding Support
White lactation specialists and white-dominated breastfeeding institutions in the US and other societies are vulnerable to manifesting racial bias—even unintentionally—due to their unseen and unearned white privilege and power. Antiracism work is an inherent part of avoiding bias and developing cultural competence, an ethical obligation of many lactation specialists and an inherent part of fulfilling institutional missions to serve mothers without discrimination. This session 1) provides an overview of the impact upon breastfeeding of racial inequities in health status, birth experience, maternal and infant perinatal outcomes, health care, employment, education, housing, and access to effective breastfeeding support and information that result from individual, institutional, and systemic racism, 2) helps participants understand how white privilege and power create racial inequities in breastfeeding support, and 3) invites participants to recognize and embrace their individual and collective responsibility to help dismantle institutional racism in the field of breastfeeding support.
Presentations: 28  |  Hours / CE Credits: 22.25  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / CE Credits: .75 (details)  |  Categories: Breastfeeding and Lactation
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Note: Currently only available through a bundled series of lectures
Brief Breastfeeding Encounters: Effective Counseling Techniques When Time is Limited
The limited time in which many lactation specialists work with breastfeeding families means that only a portion of the support and information that is needed can be provided. Therefore, a critical goal of brief breastfeeding encounters must be the initiation and nurturing of a process of learning and change that the family can sustain on their own after the encounter is over. This goal is also central to solution-focused brief therapy. This presentation offers an introduction to key concepts and techniques from solution-focused brief therapy and describes how they can be applied—in a non-psychotherapeutic manner—to the provision of breastfeeding support and lactation consulting. It includes practical tools that any lactation specialist can routinely use to work more effectively with breastfeeding families when time is limited, such as helping clients set goals that can be measured, looking for exceptions to the problem, and keeping track of progress through the use of scaling.
Presentations: 27  |  Hours / CE Credits: 25  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / CE Credits: 1 (details)  |  Categories: Breastfeeding and Lactation
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Heartbroken: Loss and Grief in the Perinatal Time Period
A variety of losses and types of grief are common in the perinatal time period. Some of these losses are specifically related to the reproductive and perinatal experience and some just happen to occur during pregnancy or after birth. Perinatal care providers who understand the diverse experience of loss and grief are better able to provide compassionate and effective care for the families they seek to serve. This presentation provides an overview of loss and grief, including the difference between bereavement, grief, and mourning; ambiguous loss; disenfranchised grief; prolonged grief; chronic sorrow; and depression. It also describes skills—such as companioning, screening, and referral—that are part of providing grief-sensitive care to expectant and new parents who are coping with loss and grief.
Presentations: 6  |  Hours / CE Credits: 6  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
Hours / CE Credits: 1 (details)  |  Categories:
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The Rug Pulled Out from Underneath Me: Depression During Pregnancy and After Birth
The prevalence of depression in pregnancy and after birth means that lactation specialists will often provide lactation support services to parents who are struggling with mental health challenges. Lactation specialists who understand how mental health and lactation interrelate will be better equipped to meet the needs of the families they serve. This presentation provides an overview of perinatal depression, including risk factors, symptoms, how breastfeeding and postpartum depression interact, lactation-compatible approaches to treating postpartum depression, and the ethical rationale for screening and referring at-risk clients for evaluation, diagnosis, and treatment of perinatal depression.
Presentations: 6  |  Hours / CE Credits: 6  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
Hours / CE Credits: 1 (details)  |  Categories: Breastfeeding and Lactation
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View Lecture
Note: Currently only available through a bundled series of lectures
Perinatal Mental Health Screening: A Primer for Lactation Specialists
Research and clinical experience show that perinatal mental health challenges are common in expectant and new parents and both influence and are influenced by the experience of lactation. Because of this interconnection, lactation specialists often must respond to perinatal mental health challenges in the context of providing lactation support services. IBCLCs have the ethical duty to “assist and support the mother and family to identify strategies to cope with peripartum mood disorders,” “assess and provide strategies to initiate and continue breastfeeding when challenging situations exist/occur,” and to make “necessary referrals to other health care providers.” This presentation 1) presents the ethical rationale for screening and referring clients for perinatal mental health challenges, 2) clarifies the difference between screening and diagnosis, 3) introduces a step-by-step approach to implementing perinatal mental health screening, and 4) gives instruction on the use of free, validated tools to screen for perinatal depression, anxiety, and trauma.
Presentations: 27  |  Hours / CE Credits: 25.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / CE Credits: 1 (details)  |  Categories: Breastfeeding and Lactation