GOLD Learning Speakers

USA

Dr. Amy Gilliland, PhD

  • Speaker Type: GOLD Midwifery 2015, GOLD Perinatal 2014
  • Country: USA
Biography:

Dr. Gilliland is an AASECT Certified Sexuality Educator, a psychology instructor at Madison College, and is one of the first DONA International birth doula trainers. Over her twenty-five year career, her work has spanned the perinatal spectrum. Dr. Gilliland has published research on birth doula support for over ten years, but has also published on female sexuality. For UW Extension, Dr. Gilliland conducts workshops on attachment and infant mental health. She has worked with hundreds of families during the perinatal period. Her real love is taking research and making it immediately useful for those at her presentations. Dr. Gilliland is a lively and engaging speaker. Her newest venture is her blog, DoulaingTheDoula. For more information, please go to www.amygilliland.com.

CE Library Presentation(s) Available Online:
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From Lovers to Parents and Back Again: A Time of Shifting Sexual Identity
All parents expect sexual adjustments during the postpartum period, however few report feeling prepared for the massive changes that occur. Research reveals that common birth practices negatively influence sex and sexuality for both men and women. They may also have a psychological impact that shows up in a couple’s sexual relationship. Midwives are uniquely situated to make changes to practice and communication that can positively influence pp sexual adjustment. In addition, midwives have the potential to fill the educational gap and provide postpartum support as parents work through these changes. This session reviews research to date and offers concrete suggestions during this life transition to a new identity.
Presentations: 10  |  Hours / CE Credits: 10.25  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / CE Credits: 1 (details)  |  Categories: Midwifery
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Let’s stop trying to turn men into women –meeting the real needs of pregnant and laboring fathers
Men are in the midst of cultural change of redefining fatherhood. What hasn’t changed yet is the cultural assumptions of perinatal professionals towards men’s involvement in pregnancy and childbirth. Taking a biopsychosocial approach to understanding male behavior and needs during labor, Dr. Gilliland utilizes gender theory, studies of men's experiences of pregnancy and birth, and her own original research to increase the effectiveness of perinatal professionals. Participants can expect to comprehend male behavior more deeply by confronting their cultural assumptions, and bringing together their own experience with new knowledge.
Presentations: 17  |  Hours / CE Credits: 17  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / CE Credits: 1 (details)  |  Categories:
Watch Today!
View Lecture
Note: Currently only available through a bundled series of lectures
The Doula Effect: how and why doulas help mothers have shorter labors, less pain, and more satisfying births
Doula support practices of mothers during labor and birth are complex processes that involve attachment behaviors, therapeutic strategies, and communication skills. Similar to the infant relying on a primary caregiver as an attachment figure, the mother relies on the doula as a secure base during labor. In both situations the doula and caregiver are available for assistance; can accurately perceive her emotional needs; effectively represent her interests; are strong and capable physically and emotionally; and have resources that the mother or infant does not possess. Additionally, the rhythm and ritual of labor support set the stage for attunement between doula and mother, similar to the attunement process between mother and infant outlined by Daniel Stern. This research is significant since it provides a strong theoretical basis why doulas are effective; namely that they provide a focus for attachment behavior and provide a secure base for the laboring mother. The doula as a secure base theory also offers a well developed explanation why nurses have been shown to be less effective than doulas in obtaining the same outcomes. Except in unusual situations, nurses and fathers are unable to fulfill many of these attachment functions for mothers. With further development, this may become the fundamental theory of doula support.
Presentations: 17  |  Hours / CE Credits: 17  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / CE Credits: 1 (details)  |  Categories: